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Favorite Linux IDE

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Hello, I before I start a flame war, I will tell you all that I want just names and something like a salespitch for your favorite IDE. I am looking for an easy learning curve for someone who is familiar with MSVC++, ie me. I just got a job here at work and we are developing under linux which I have never done before. Would love it if you guys could inform me of some good IDEs I could use. Dwiel

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Might wanna ask the guys you work with so you can easiliy give files to each other.

The only ones I''ve used are Anjuta and KDevelop. KDevelop is quite similar to MSVC.

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Interim: VI or Vim, is not what this person is looking for.

"I am looking for an easy learning curve for someone who is familiar with MSVC++,"

Sorry VI is not this. It is an excelent editor, but easy to learn all of its power is not easy.

Tazzel3D: I''d suggest googleing or look aroung source forge. Look at some screen shots and descriptions.

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One set back to being in the Linux/Unix crowd, no sense of humor.

Ask the same question on a Linux or Unix message board and expect to hear the war erupt:

"VIM vs Emacs".

I guess I need to pass out laughing gas to get a joke through =)

But since we''re serious:

http://www.linuxworld.com/linuxworld/lw-1999-06/lw-06-vcontrol_1.html

Good article about some of the most famous developers and their tools (again not an answer, but interesting.)

Codewarrior (about 150 bucks I think):

http://www.metrowerks.com/MW/Develop/Desktop/Linux/Professional/Default.htm

And here''s probably the best, a search from Freshmeat.net!

http://freshmeat.net/browse/65/?topic_id=65

There are about 119 responses, I would create a freshmeat.net account and then sort by rating to find the most "user approved".

Interim

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quote:
Original post by Interim
One set back to being in the Linux/Unix crowd, no sense of humor.
No, it''s a setback of being around Unix users without enough sense of history. The second I saw that I was laughing, and I was expecting an "Emacs or death!" follow-up post. I guess not.

CodeWarrior is a good option if you''re looking to pay for the IDE. Eclipse is another option, though I''ve never used it and can''t pitch it. Generally speaking, Linux IDEs suck compared to MSVC. Well, very few IDEs hang well with MSVC...

KDevelop is probably the most similar to MSVC (much like the rest of KDE is very similar to Windows, but that''s a whole new thread).

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heh, true, true. =)

Funny thing is, how you can get die hard Emac and Vi users to argue why they are IDEs. =)

Used to work with a Sun admin in Manhatten, just had to mention some problem with Emacs and he would be busy and red faced for hours. -)

Interim

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I use Eclipse for Java/J2EE development here at work. It is by far the best IDE for Java based applications I''ve used. I''ve also used JBuilder, but Eclipse is free and far better. As for C/C++ work, I''ve used Anjuta, KDevelop, and C-Forge. C-Forge is probably the most powerful, but the ugliest of the bunch since it uses Motif. It also supports the most languages. Anjuta and KDevelop are very similiar, but as stated above, KDevelop is very much like MSVC.

-----------------------------
kevin@mayday-anime.com
http://www.mayday-anime.com

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i quite like Kate (not really an IDE, but an editor), comes with the KDE base package. the latest version has got that expanding and collapsing of classes and functions that''s in the latest version of MSVC, which is pretty sweet. also has a side panel where you can browse through your directory tree to open files, which is useful. i don''t actually use it anymore cos i like using emacs but that''s another story.

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I''ve used older versions of both Anjuta and KDevelop, and wasn''t too impressed by either. Anjuta was certainly not bad, but there were a few things about it that annoyed me.

KDevelop, on the other hand, has apparently improved a great deal with the latest release, and I''m willing to give it another try now.

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Go for KDevelop 3. You will find troubles understanding how to make/use libraries, but you''ll get used to it with time.

If you really want to learn do a simple "hello world main()" for console with a text editor and then write a simple make file for it. Then add complexity to it, until you can''t handle to write the makefile by yourself, and then go with kdevelop.

Motor is good and easy also, but it runs in console only.

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Vim and Xemacs/Emacs scare the beejezus outta me. I start looking at all the keyboard control shortcuts and my head starts swimming. I think CoolEdit is about as deep a hard-core editor as I want.

I''ve only played around with Anjuta, though I have to admit, I only make toy programs, so I''m not sure how scaleable it is when your projects start getting big.

BTW, I saw a book on GCC for 50$ that looked interesting. It gave all sorts of tips and information on how to do lots of things from the command line with GCC. Since I''ve only worked with Anjuta, it was interesting (though obviously complex). But at least it gave me an idea of some of things that were going on while compiling (I always wondered what -Walloff was). However, GCC is a bit more than I can chew off for right now, as even understanding makefile rules, targets and dependencies can be a bit challenging for me right now. Why learnmakefiles if I''m using Anjuta? Because when I look at Anjuta''s pre-built makefiles, I have absolutely no clue what in the hell its doing.

Sometimes I''ve tried to "debug" a tarball compilation that wouldn''t compile by looking at the makefile to see what it''s doing. So I think at least learning makefiles is a good thing. Maybe once I master makefiles I''ll move on to command line GCC (and maybe even dip my toe into the Vim/Emacs thing).

Just some suggestions to mull over.

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quote:
Original post by CoffeeMug
I strongly disagree

Actually, look at the vim tutorial. That''s how I learned how to use vim, and now I love it.

Of course, vi I hate with a passion, but you''d have to be an idiot to use vi when vim is available. Emacs also sucks. Stay away from it at all costs.

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I used emacs in school and have tried vi. I really like emacs once you get over the learning curve. You can do just about anything with it. I never liked vi that much. Currently though, I use Kdevelop 2.15. I find it is easier for me to manage larger projects with Kdevelop than it is with emacs.

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quote:
Original post by Interim
I guess I need to pass out laughing gas to get a joke through =)


Joke? I was betting with myself how many posts it took for someone to say "vi" or "emacs". It''s getting old. Really old.

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quote:
Original post by Dauntless
BTW, I saw a book on GCC for 50$ that looked interesting. It gave all sorts of tips and information on how to do lots of things from the command line with GCC. Since I''ve only worked with Anjuta, it was interesting (though obviously complex). But at least it gave me an idea of some of things that were going on while compiling (I always wondered what -Walloff was). However, GCC is a bit more than I can chew off for right now, as even understanding makefile rules, targets and dependencies can be a bit challenging for me right now.


man gcc - It''s free!

quote:

Why learnmakefiles if I''m using Anjuta? Because when I look at Anjuta''s pre-built makefiles, I have absolutely no clue what in the hell its doing.


That''s automake/conf. It''s functional, but not a good thing to learn makefiles with.

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Well, I tried most of the IDEs in linux, I will probably try eclipse with the C++ plugin, but usually I just go back to emacs, I can ssh into my computer and do work, I can also ssh into the CS department''s computers and see if my code compiles under solaris. I don''t really like vi, probably more because I learned emacs first, and really have no need as far as resources are concerned to learn any vi-like text editor.

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quote:
Original post by Arild Fines
quote:
Original post by Interim
I guess I need to pass out laughing gas to get a joke through =)


Joke? I was betting with myself how many posts it took for someone to say "vi" or "emacs". It''s getting old. Really old.


LMAO. Welcome to the Unix community. Most of the arguments pre-date most of the posters on here (maybe not me though, getting old). =)

But, I guarantee if you polled most serious Unix programmers, you''d get a mix of "VIM or EMACS" for their IDE of choice. It''s why I posted the link to some of the OSS community leaders and their tools of choice. Whether people use VIM/EMACs because of a lack of a good IDE or because they simply can''t find an IDE that gives them the text power editing of VIM or EMACs, I don''t know.

I use VI or VIm. Having most of my experience managing internet services on Unix for ISPs, its the one editor I''m guaranteed to find on just about every box on the internet regardless of distribution, distributer, or integrater. Though to be honest, my primary job isn''t programming, so I have not done large projects with VI, But it works for me. In fact, once you learn how to interact with the shell through VI/VIM, I find using editors such as joe, nano and such to be patheticly awkard for most sys admin tasks.

Nothing like pulling up the output of a simple shell command, then running a search and replace from command mode and then saving. Used to take me less than 30 seconds to edit huge DNS zone files, and without writing custom scripts.

Interim


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Guest Anonymous Poster
You might want to check out SciTE.....

It is based on the Scintilla engine, has some really great features like line numbers, paren matching, ''compile'' - ''build'' - ''run'' type commands similar to VC, an output window (again... like VC) and some other pretty nifty features that remind one of intellisense (uh yeah... again... like VC ).

Favorite thing is the OpenGL API plugin for the editor, makes OpenGL coding just a tad easier.

Check it out at http://www.scintilla.org

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I run Anjuta and rdesktop to connect back to my WinXP box and run MSVC7.1, then mount the server share, where I keep the source, using samba.

If Anjuta did not *insist* on making copies of the source files when you added them to your project it would be easy. I have no idea why it does this, other than to piss me off. I add the source files, close Anjuta, delete the source files, and make symbolic links to the samba share, then restart Anjuta.

Anjuta is kinda stupid about touching the source files and doesn't auto-update the files like MSVC does when they change on disk.

I tried to use KDevelop too, but there was some unreconcilable problem which I have forgotten... it did auto-update like MSVC though.

Latetly, I've given up on Anjuta, and just recompile the project using the makefile it generated and edit the source on the XP box.

Dev-C++ is making a Linux port, which should be verra-naice when it is ready.

[edited by - Magmai Kai Holmlor on June 8, 2003 1:39:49 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The IDE for Linux I had seen is one for Linux:

ANJUTA http://www.anjuta.org
try it! =)

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Heh,

A seriously hacked-up vim/gvim for life is my motto these days, though for a few years I was an Xemacs hermit for just programming ( classic vi for editing though ). I grew tired of the resource-intensive nature of Xemacs and all the LISP hacking to get things ''just so'', so I made the painful switch.

Kdevelop was the most awful IDE I''ve ever tried to hunker-down and use. I think this just continues the tradition, IMO, of KDE sucking badly ( let the flames begin, I''m sure ). I''d rather use a stream-editor like ''ed'' before I''d use Kdevelop.

I grit my teeth everytime I have to fire up Visual Studio 6.


lol,

.zfod

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