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Hard Wiring Processor Instructions

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I was reading the article on Chess Programming on Gamedev and I was just throwing around some ideas and I ran across this one. I can write a little assembly as needed, but I don''t know a whole lot about it. Well each processor has an instruction set, and that instruction set is made up of hard wired instructions that are executed when they are told to (please correct me if anything I''m saying is wrong). So I''m thinking about the concept of creating an instruction set that better suited the game of chess and simply make a machine that did nothing buy play chess. My question has to do with the reality of this concept. I''m wondering how complex processor instructions can be. If I made an instruction that computed an array of legal moves in a given chess position, would thit very complex instruction execute as fast as say a "mov" instruction would? Or would it be slower due to it''s complexity? Or would you be able to make an instruction that complex at all? If something like this is possible, then it would certainly speed up a chess machine, since things like computing legal moves take up a good amount of processing with current processor instructions. I''m just kinda throwing the idea around. Let me know what you guys think. Merge http://merge.to

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different instructions do take up different amounts of time depending on their complexity. For example, to shift a binary number to the right twice is much faster than using the divide instruction. I believe this is where the concept of RISC vs. CISC processors comes in. Instructions can be rather complex. I believe the x86 line has instructions to move n amount of data from position x to position y (heck, I know for sure the z80(gameboy''s processor) can do that so why not x86?). I don''t know exactly how complex they can get however.

hope that helped
arsenius



after three days without programming, life becomes meaningless

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Guest Anonymous Poster
all computers are essentially the same, you have instructions that are important for the computer to operate like adding, addressing, direct and indirect, shifting, subtracting, complimenting, etc. creating a computer with such complex instructions would be ludicrous. Combining all these instructions into a working program is the whole point of assembly language, and any complex "chess" instructions would still require all of the essential operations the computer needed anyway. Why not just use the assembly languge, that''s what its for, to combine all of the computers instructions to make the computer perform more complicated tasks. Plus, debugging a hard wired function would be a bitch, wouldnt you think?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I would say that unless you have some fairly complex tools. You would also need to know your digital logic gates really quite well. I imagine that to build such a processor using single transistors or logic gate chips would make an extremely large processor. Also, I expect that such a processor might use much more power to operate than a single chip processor. With the proper tools and knowledge, the idea itself however would not be ludicrous if you were designing a machine for the sole purpose of playing chess. The whole concept of computer graphics acceleration cards is based on the fact that hard wired electronics take much less time to execute than software code. How else would a graphic processor running at around 180 MHz can compete at rendering graphics with a 600 or 800 MHz CPU?! I say that if you''ve got everything you need, a well designed chess processor could be better than even the GHz computer systems.

-DaMan

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Guest Anonymous Poster
http://www.cradle.com/press/12071999.html
something on the same topic

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If you really want to make specialized hardware for playing chess I suggest microcontrollers. Individually they are fairly slow, but they are cheap, and usually come with a really fast IO scheme (correct me if I''m wrong, I^2C).

None the less that would be an incredible amount of work.

Another thing that''s a little interesting is that Transmeta''s Crusoe processor supposedly has the ability to switch instruction sets. Its kind of like there''s a processor inside emulating an intel processor.

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