• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

FreeStylerFunk

Our Game...

7 posts in this topic

Hi, I''m head of P4F (Programming4Fun) and we''re making our first game using the DirectX 7.0 SDK. And to get some info about our possible fans and some feedback on our ideas I want some answers to these question: 1.What kind of files should we use for our music files (MIDI''s, MP3''s or even WAv''s?) 2.Our first game is going to be a sci-fi rpg. However, we got some negative feedback when we told our public that it''s going to be pre-rendered as opposed to real-time. What is your opinion on the game being pre-rendered. 3.What do you think is more important to a website flashy graphics and content, or mediocre graphics but more content? Thanx in advance if you answering these questions, and no, there isn''t going to be a website soon because we''re in the middle of pre-production of Cutting Edge (Our sci-fi rpg). ,FreeStylerFunk -Gaming is about fun not graphics
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1) Use modular music (.it, .mod, .xm, etc.) its smaller than mp3, and just as good quality.

2) Prerendered is _alot_ easier to do than realtime, so if this is one of your first projects, go with prerendered...If you do realtime, it will take much longer, and you may lose interest anyway.

3) Flashy graphics and good content But really, try to get the best graphics you are capable of, and fill it in with the most content possible.

Hope that helps.



---------------
Ibuku
AmaDev
www.amadev.net
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mod and mp3 are nothing alike. MOD is not a sound file, mp3 is. MOD is a library of sounds with data for playing each sound as a particular note/beat. MODs are only good for techo because all you can truly do with a MOD is use it for precussion and synth bass sounds.

Now if you want to know the best route to go, that''s obviously DirectMusic.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3. Small good graphics, don''t make huge lame animated pictures that take 5 minutes to load. If your site takes over a minute to load I just close the window. I hate when people to flash start up screens or big title pages, where they make a big picture that says their sites name, and some lame picture or something.

-piksel
My site
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1) Modules
2) No huge difference to be honest, (WARNING! CLICHE IMMINENT) the gameplay is more important.
3) Definitely content. Do it all straight text, no framesets or tables or anything and do content rather than another site with a beautiful Flash front end and no news since May 1999.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3. I don''t think bland, lifeless text is the answer. The main contact people are going to have with your game will be through your website, if you have an amateurish web page then you will appear to be an amateurish developer. You don''t need to use flash, java-script or a large number of pictures to create a good looking website though. If you stick to a good color scheme and keep a good consistent layout then you can make a nice, professional looking site that won''t take forever to download. Whenever people post in this forum with links to their games you can usually tell how good the game will be from the appearance of the site.

-- Kazan - Fire Mountain Games --
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, like a beta version my page is up. Goto http://p4f.homestead.com/files/index.htm and not just p4f.homestead.com ''cause it''s just the placeholder created with the HomeStead editor, and I made my own pages and uploaded them, so just check it out!

-Gaming is about fun not graphics
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Nevar

mod and mp3 are nothing alike. MOD is not a sound file, mp3 is. MOD is a library of sounds with data for playing each sound as a particular note/beat. MODs are only good for techo because all you can truly do with a MOD is use it for precussion and synth bass sounds.

Now if you want to know the best route to go, that''s obviously DirectMusic.


Er, what??

MOD is a sound file. It''s not a sample file, but it is a sound file. MODS are -not- only good for techno. Check out http://metalscene.cjb.net/ - although it''s not everybody''s favourite music, it''s not techno and a lot of it works well. You can also make great atmospheric and medieval music with MODs.

DirectMusic is also Microsoft proprietary, platform dependent, and without the backing of a huge community like MODs have. Chances are high that module-type formats will outlive DirectMusic by many years.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites