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Inquisitor

Making a shareware living

13 posts in this topic

I''m just curious to know how many of GDNet''s visitors are actually making a living as indies. `~Inquis~`
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I''m not quite that advanced to start selling things on-line but I''m looking into it. Yes you can make a living off of share ware, but getting rich is tough.

The main thing is, getting your product out the door and making sure someone will fork over $20 bucks for it. (I just threw that price in there )

Just don''t lose hope, keep going. The brick walls will come, but you have to put your head down and charge through them. There is a good book on all aspects of game developing, including shareware, I''m going through it for the second time actually. It''s called:
Game Design: Secret of the Sages

It''s an awesome book! You won''t be able to put it down!

............
Guardian Angel Interactive
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Wow, thats wierd... I came to this board (I usually post in the General Game Programming section) to ask this very same question... Im considering quitting the rat race and develop games by myself or with a few buds. Is developing and distributing games via shareware feasable these days? I dont need to get rich right away, but can a person make say... atleast 30k a year with a decent game?
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I''m not making a living yet. I have made a few games, but I and my team have chosen not to sell them because of quality. Our current project does have the quality, so look out in 2001.

Domini
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Orpheum, are you currently employed in the game industry rat race, or a different rat race?
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Just the rat race in general... I have an interview with Microsoft''s game division coming up tho. I was thinking that life would just be better in general (less stress, no commute, etc) to go indie.
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I work as a gamedeveloper in Denmark (games for children).

But my private project is much more fun!!

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It''s too damn hard to get into the games (or programming in general) biz without a BS... Im thinking of going back to college.... (shit!!!)
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There is a reason that it is difficult to "get into programming" without a degree.

Any employer who is going to invest in hiring you wants some assurance that you actually know what you are doing. Even though the projects you typically have to write for classes are not even close to being on the same scale as a commercial product, you tend to soak up a lot of general background information during the 4 (or 5, 6, 7 ... years that you are there.
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They stop looking at your degree(s) if you have enough experience. I have 15+ and I''m a high school drop out. I didn''t (and couldn''t) work in Corporate Amaerica until I had 6+ years. Until that point I worked small Mom and Pop shops. I am now an independentant (contractor scum) and not even thinking of getting a degree (i''d need to go back to high school first )
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I have an "honest" job that pays for food. We do the games more for fun. When you''re charging (sometimes) 10 bucks a pop, you don''t make money quick!
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Well I finsihed high school, but Im still 25 credits away from an AS... Ive been programming for 2 years now and feel that I can handle commercial programming. I hit brick walls every now and then, but thats nothing MSDN or the good ole gdnet message boards cant cure. =) I just hate the thought of giving up my well paying corporate job to go back to school.... I worked full time and went to school for 4 years (which is why I still havent finished my damn degree) and Im not going to do it again. Maybe Ill work 20 hours at some bull shit job... its gonna hard to go from caviar to chile con carne. If only I had gotten into programming 5 years ago............ I was interrested, but I didnt have a compiler and my parents wouldnt schuck out the $$$ for one. I lost my modem for DLing porn so I couldnt DL DJGPP (or know about it). owell.......... looks like school here I come =(
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heh

well, iam wondering this, im planning on attednign full sail in one or two years,

anyone think going shareware during 2 year (with bundle games done every 3-4) can support my education ther e? (basicly $40k)
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