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markhsch

Any interest?

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I''m just testing the waters to see if I should pursue this little research project I started. Basically I was able to skin an OpenGL application. Skinning in the sense of window skinning, not model skinning. Basically, I was able to make a spinning OpenGL cube on the desktop without the perfunctory black background for the window. All you see is a spinning cube without a window. The performance isn''t the best and there is an issue with refresh which is why I ask if I should still pursue it and finish it up. The final bits would more than likely be in article form. Let me know if this is a) interesting and something I should finish, b) uninteresting or c) a "been there done that". -Mark P.S. Is perfunctory even a word? It sounded good. :-)

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interesting, if you can get performance similar to non-transparent windowed OpenGL, and other applications are still fully responsive.

And, yes, ''perfunctory'' is a word. But I don''t think it means what you think it means.


How appropriate. You fight like a cow.

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quote:
Original post by Sneftel
interesting, if you can get performance similar to non-transparent windowed OpenGL, and other applications are still fully responsive.

And, yes, 'perfunctory' is a word. But I don't think it means what you think it means.


How appropriate. You fight like a cow.


Not sure about the performance. Working with window regions can get slow. I think I might pursue it to see if I can create some sort of 3D UI engine for applications. Here's a screenshot: http://www.schmidt6.com/stuff/skingl.jpg
I was wrong it's not a cube. One thing you obviously can't see is the fact that the pyramid is spinning.

-Mark

[edited by - markhsch on July 2, 2003 3:03:06 PM]

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I think that's pretty slick actually... could have some interesting applications (the first thing in my evil little mind was a 3D version of the Evil Paperclip From Hell :D )

I too have done dynamic animated windows with skinning, although mine are mostly sliding drawers and such. The performance isn't too bad, but with complicated windows it can be a terribly nasty pain. One idea I had for my engine (but never got around to) was finding some way to split the image into as few rectangles as I could, since adding rectangles to a region seems to be by far the slowest part of the job. I don't know how easy it would be to split the image up, but I would imagine you could gain a lot of performance by doing it. I just wish the GDI had a bitmap-to-region function...

Oh yes:
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=perfunctory

[edited by - ApochPiQ on July 2, 2003 9:11:47 PM]

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