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computer_guy

How to pronounce C++

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computer_guy    122
This has been a question in my mind that I have had for some time now. How do you pronounce C++??? Is it C double pluss or C pluss pluss. Thanks in advance.

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PhilVaz    144
Oh no, I remember a 2 billion post thread on this just a couple months ago. I'll try to find it.

It's "See Plus Plus" not "See Addition Addition"

That's nothing. Now figure out how to pronounce

Bjarne Stroustrup

Phil P

[edited by - PhilVaz on July 6, 2003 4:16:41 AM]

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This question has been asked and answered...

I think?

I think its under GameDev Lounge.

I used to pronounce the language as "C double plus" but it seems I was wrong.

You will find out in GameDev Lounge approximately one month ago.

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Arild Fines    968
quote:
Original post by Waverider
And from what I understand, C# is "sea sharp", not "sea pound" or "sea tic-tac-toe".

"sea octothorpe", "sea hash".



AnkhSVN - A Visual Studio .NET Addin for the Subversion version control system.

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MichaelBartman    122
Read the Bjarne Stroustrup faq posted above. C increment was a little joke that poked fun at it.

Michael Bartman
CEO, Lead Programmer
Dark Omen Studios
http://www.darkomenstudios.com/

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Maximus    124
quote:
Original post by Joe-Bob
Actually, I think that C++ MEANS C Increment, but it''s still pronounced Sea Plus Plus.


Its a play on words with the name. C++ is essential the next increment in the C language, and C++ is incrementing the C variable by 1 (given that C is an integer type, which for here we will assume it is).

It kinda goes together, hand in hand, the way I see it.

-----------------------
"When I have a problem on an Nvidia, I assume that it is my fault. With anyone else''s drivers, I assume it is their fault" - John Carmack

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PhiberOptic    128
quote:
Original post by PhilVaz
Oh no, I remember a 2 billion post thread on this just a couple months ago. I''ll try to find it.

It''s "See Plus Plus" not "See Addition Addition"

That''s nothing. Now figure out how to pronounce

Bjarne Stroustrup

Phil P

[edited by - PhilVaz on July 6, 2003 4:16:41 AM]


What''s the problem with that?? ;-P


However.. I use to call it: ++C :-)

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Wildfire    154
Since C++ uses the post increment operator... does that mean it''s still C and will be advanced after the current step is complete? Dang, I don''t want to wait for the next release...

quote:

And from what I understand, C# is "sea sharp", not "sea pound" or "sea tic-tac-toe".



Nope. C# is actually pronounced ''c hash''. As in ''cash''. As in Micro$oft

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Wildfire
Since C++ uses the post increment operator... does that mean it''s still C and will be advanced after the current step is complete? Dang, I don''t want to wait for the next release...



Urrmm.. actually it means create a temporary with the value of C, increment C then return the temporary. So the advancement is done before the current step is complete.

i.e. "somefunc( C++ );" will advance C before calling the func but the temporary variable will be passed instead of the new value.

Pete

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Wildfire    154

long array[20] ={0,1,2,...,19};
long index =0;

long a =array[index++];


The content of a is now array[0]. index is incremented after the assignement took place. Therefore the increment is done after the current step is complete.

Besides that, it was a joke darnit!

edit: oops, should not forget to close tags

[edited by - Wildfire on July 8, 2003 9:03:35 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Wildfire
The content of a is now array[0] . index is incremented after the assignement took place. Therefore the increment is done after the current step is complete.


No index is incremented before (I''m almost certain of it) but the variable used as the index is a temporary variable with the value zero (the old value of index). The distinction can be important if the expression throws an exception (in which case index will have already been incremented).

quote:
Besides that, it was a joke darnit!


Yeah sorry, I do take things too far sometimes.

Pete

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Wildfire    154
if (expression)
  throw someException();

Doesn''t the ''throw'' technically happen after the expression has been evaluated?

if (index++=0)
  throw someException();

When the computer evaluates the expression index is still zero. The expression is true, so the function following it will be exectued. Before that the post-increment will take place though.
(That''s at least how I''d see it)

do pre-increments > evaluate expression > do post-increments > go to next expression.


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Peter Vidler    122
We''re getting really off-topic now -- nevermind.

Check out http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/002.htm or as a quote:

quote:
Preincrement is more efficient than postincrement, because for postincrement the object must increment itself and then return a temporary containing its old value. Note that this is true even for builtins like int!


If it returns a temporary then the addition must take place first. As for the exception issue consider a funtion "some_func" that will throw an exception, used with "some_func( i++ );"... does i get incremented even though the function will not return properly? Yes.

Although this is kind of misleading as all arguments passed to a function are evaluated before the call.. I''m just too lazy to sit down and work out a more complex example.

Pete

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SabreMan    504
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
No index is incremented before (I''m almost certain of it)

Its unspecified.
quote:

The distinction can be important if the expression throws an exception (in which case index will have already been incremented).

In the case of built-ins, the expression cannot throw an exception. For UDTs, the function-call becomes a sequence point that guarantees order of evaluation. Still, it would be very bad form to throw an exception from prefix or postfix decrement.

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