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Lionheartadi

DirectX9 and .NET

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Lionheartadi    154
Hi I have a general wondering. Since the release of .NET architecture, you preaty much had to download it to your windows to keep your system updated. I am curently working on a DirectX engine which is going on greatly. I gave my DirectX project to a friend of mine to test it and he seemed to have problems to start it. Then I tested my project on different machines and worked fine. The only difference was the .NET architecture missing from my firends computer. On all the other computer and mine ofcourse they all have .NET installed. MY friend hasn''t installed it. So my question is does DX9 require .NET installed on your computer in order for a DX9 application to work? Well he does have an undercloaked CPU due to a motherboard problem this may be on of the reasons, but dunno. I really would like to know. My ques is that it doesn''t, but I am not sure that''s why I am asking. So if anyone knows please enlight me . Thanks for any response.

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Miksan    126
It might be because you linked your program with the shared dlls? What if you try with static libraries? Or did you do the program with managed code? It might need the framework. But these are only guesses... DirectX 9.0 should not demand .NET framework if I''m not totally lost.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
If your program is managed code then the clients will have to have the necessary .NET runtime.

DirectX9 has a managed interface, but you don''t have to use it (like if you are writing in unmanaged C++).

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Lionheartadi    154
quote:
Original post by Miksan
It might be because you linked your program with the shared dlls? What if you try with static libraries? Or did you do the program with managed code? It might need the framework. But these are only guesses... DirectX 9.0 should not demand .NET framework if I''m not totally lost.


Hmm... I haven''t used any .NET libraries, well not to my knowledge. The windows interface is plain Win32 API code and the rest is just standard C libraries, STL and ofcourse DX9 stuff to get the application to do something, so no I guess.

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Lionheartadi    154
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
If your program is managed code then the clients will have to have the necessary .NET runtime.

DirectX9 has a managed interface, but you don't have to use it (like if you are writing in unmanaged C++).


Ok stupid question. What does managed and unmanaged code stands for when it comes to .NET framework and c++? Well besides the meaning of the words what can you do or what does it do?

[edited by - LionheartAdi on July 7, 2003 1:27:55 AM]

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Lionheartadi    154
quote:
Original post by Lionheartadi
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
If your program is managed code then the clients will have to have the necessary .NET runtime.

DirectX9 has a managed interface, but you don''t have to use it (like if you are writing in unmanaged C++).


Ok stupid question. What does managed and unmanaged code stands for when it comes to .NET framework and c++? Well besides the meaning of the words what can you do or what does it do?

[edited by - LionheartAdi on July 7, 2003 1:27:55 AM]



Ok forget the question I think I know now what''s the difference between managed an unmanaged and I have to say Uh... I like unmanaged. Freedom of choice is the best.

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Ratman    181
quote:
Original post by Lionheartadi
Ok forget the question I think I know now what''s the difference between managed an unmanaged and I have to say Uh... I like unmanaged. Freedom of choice is the best.



Just some advice: Dont look at which one if "better", look at what each one can do well and when/why you would want to use it. Its easy to see something different, decide its no good, and then snub it forever. They''re just tools for doing different jobs, thats all.

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