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Lionheartadi

How to get rid of managed DirectX? and is it wise to do so?

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Hi Well I just spended about one hour find out what the heck is the difference between managed and unmanaged DirectX. Now I have a fair understandment about managed and unmanaged mode. What I read about managed code didn''t inspire me to use it. I mean sure I sounds cool that when you use managed vertexbuffers you don''t have to worry about locking and releasing, but I find such things... well wrong. I don''t know I just feels like soon a programmer doesn''t have to know anything about anything. Ok I may over react. Well anyway I don''t want to use managed DirectX I doesn''t feel like coding when the compiler, DirectX or clr what ever does it all for you. Sure I cool to have an API that like DirectX that offers you alot of functionalities, but if you don''t know the basics whats the point of doing anything. I want to learn the hardway . I want to be able to manage the code myself and so on. So how do I make sure that I don''t acidently use managed code in DirectX? Is such thing wise? Thinking some years back, managed code stuff is for me atleast an strange concept. I am actually buying a book about graphics programming published in 1995 to learn how things where done in the old days. I am still at the learning stage so correct and englight me with knowledge . I want to learn as much as possible to manage the code and not let the code manage how do I program. Well feel free to give any comment on the subject. Knowledge is goooood. Thanks for any advice and help.

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I'm using DX9, and I'm not using managed DX so buying an old book isn't really what you have to do to not use managed code. Of course, I am using C++ and I don't know if managed DX is a C#/VB.net only thing and I don't know what language you are using.

Michael Bartman
CEO, Lead Programmer
Dark Omen Studios
http://www.darkomenstudios.com/


[edited by - MichaelBartman on July 7, 2003 3:04:20 AM]

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quote:
Original post by MichaelBartman
I''m using DX9, and I''m not using managed DX so buying an old book isn''t really what you have to do to not use managed code. Of course, I am using C++ and I don''t know if managed DX is a C#/VB.net only thing and I don''t know what language you are using.

Michael Bartman
CEO, Lead Programmer
Dark Omen Studios
http://www.darkomenstudios.com/


[edited by - MichaelBartman on July 7, 2003 3:04:20 AM]


Ouh jeah I forgot to tell what language C++. I haven''t seen any reason why I should use VB.NET or C#. So it''s C++

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I think Assembler would be the best language for you. Cause C++ manages already a lot for you.

Have fun
Bunnz
www.bunnz.com

[edited by - Bunnz on July 7, 2003 3:38:53 AM]

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As far as I know, you don''t have to do anything special in C++ and DX9 to not use managed DX. Just don''t do anything to enable it, i.e. pragma any managed libraries in or include any headers for managed DX.

Michael Bartman
CEO, Lead Programmer
Dark Omen Studios
http://www.darkomenstudios.com/

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quote:
Original post by MichaelBartman
As far as I know, you don''t have to do anything special in C++ and DX9 to not use managed DX. Just don''t do anything to enable it, i.e. pragma any managed libraries in or include any headers for managed DX.

Michael Bartman
CEO, Lead Programmer
Dark Omen Studios
http://www.darkomenstudios.com/


Hmm... Ok. I''ll have to check the SDK and my code. Thx I''ll look into this.

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quote:
Original post by Bunnz
I think Assembler would be the best language for you. Cause C++ manages already a lot for you.

Have fun
Bunnz
www.bunnz.com

[edited by - Bunnz on July 7, 2003 3:38:53 AM]


Heh... yeah I plan to use assembler as an optimization method, but writing an full assembler based 3d engine eh... to hard perhaps or at very least time consuming. I mean for me.

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If I understand correctly you want to take care of loading and unloading of resources from system memory to hardware memory? Hrm.. It seems you may be taking on more then you can handle. Direct3d does ALOT for you on handling memory. Your textures are loaded in such a way that only the most recent used ones are loaded in memory, and also makes sure that you don''t lose your resources when lose the state of your devices. From where I''m looking at it, you''re complaining about a very good thing.

~Wave

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quote:
So how do I make sure that I don''t acidently use managed code in DirectX?

Well, what language are you programming in? If it''s called C# or Visual Basic.NET, you are almost certainly accidentally using managed DirectX. If it''s called C++, there''s a very teeny tiny remote possibility that you''re accidentally using managed DirectX. Seek assistance immediately and try to avoid contact with other people until a proper diagnosis has been made.

Your desire to control every minute detail of what you''re doing is commendable. And in fact if you want to really dig deep, look into assembly programming. Every programmer should do this, IMO, almost like an initiation rite. In fact I don''t know of a single programmer whom I consider top-notch who is not fluent in assembly language. (For that matter you could also learn how logic gates work, and transistors, and the physics behind them...)

But don''t be surprised if, as you gain experience and become more comfortable with what''s going on under the hood, you also become more comfortable with the idea of letting code manage things for you that tend to be tedious and error prone.

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quote:
Original post by Donavon Keithley
quote:
So how do I make sure that I don't acidently use managed code in DirectX?

Well, what language are you programming in? If it's called C# or Visual Basic.NET, you are almost certainly accidentally using managed DirectX. If it's called C++, there's a very teeny tiny remote possibility that you're accidentally using managed DirectX. Seek assistance immediately and try to avoid contact with other people until a proper diagnosis has been made.

Your desire to control every minute detail of what you're doing is commendable. And in fact if you want to really dig deep, look into assembly programming. Every programmer should do this, IMO, almost like an initiation rite. In fact I don't know of a single programmer whom I consider top-notch who is not fluent in assembly language. (For that matter you could also learn how logic gates work, and transistors, and the physics behind them...)

But don't be surprised if, as you gain experience and become more comfortable with what's going on under the hood, you also become more comfortable with the idea of letting code manage things for you that tend to be tedious and error prone.


I do infact like to have some things managed for me. Especially if I need to save time and the subject on which I'm working on is familiar to me and I really really know what I am doing, but as I said a bit earlier I am at a learning stage. In my opinion and in my experience doing something and not understanding the very basics of it you will end up scraching your head and wondering what have I done wrongly. Or perhaps you need to optimize and you don't know how to do it anymore. Well I just mean that it doesn't hurt to understand as much as possible.

I do have do some assembler language programming on intel 8 bit processor and have some knowledge how do really computer chips, transistor etc... work, but not to much. I plan to go more deeply in assembly language as soon as I have finished the first stage of my curent DX9 engine.

Anyway to sum all up I can't wait to learn more and more. I think that if you really want to be a damn good programmer is good to know the very basics as assembler. Well I love programming .



[edited by - LionheartAdi on July 7, 2003 4:20:56 AM]

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