• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

2d fighter

This topic is 6453 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

hello all I am currently learning the basics of C, then will go onto Visual C and games programming, I was wondering if a 2D fighter would be a good (ie not too hard) project for a first game? I (dont ask me why) was/am a huge fan of the Street Fighter series, the SNK arcade/neo geo fighters like Art of Fighting, etc and would love to make something like that. Thanks Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Definetly don''t try to make a fighter as your first project. It''s VERY VERY hard to make one. Try something like Pong or Tetris.

-------------------------
-Now Working on Pokemon like Engine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you are not good at C/C++ and Direct X, don''t expect to be able to make a game anytime soon.

I, like Marauderz, suggest something simple. y first game was a shooting gallery. Basically a target moves back and forth accross the top of the screen and you control a gun at the bottom of the screen. I also did a darts game.

Domini

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Try Pong or Tetris, something without levels in, nonscrolling. That makes it somewhat easier to do.
2D Fighters are horrendously difficult for a first game.

Edited by - furby100 on June 21, 2000 1:02:21 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huh? hard? maybe when they get complicated, but surely the basics of a 2d fighter are easy. Get Input, set state (PUCHING, KICKING etc.), Draw, check for collision, compare states, resolve damage.

However, I too would say, make PONG first!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the only thing i can see as being challenging for making a 2D fighting game for a first time game would be coming up with a way to check for special attacks. i can think up a pretty easy way to do that right now, but i definitely wouldn''t have been able to when i first started out. i''ve come a long way since that stage, though, and it can all be attributed to all of the stuff i''ve read.

my biggest suggestion is to read continuously. mostly, you''ll want to read articles on game logic. i kind of regret it in a way now because it seems like every night when i try to go to sleep, some new way of implementing that cool new effect pops in my head and i can''t get to sleep cause my brain won''t succumb to the delta waves...


HEH, i''m a code head...

david

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you make a fighter game then remember that you will need to do pixel perfect collision for that kind of game...bounding boxes just wont do the trick....well it will but will be very crappy......and I warn you............pixel perfect collision is a bi*** to implement but the time and effort are worth it
I spent about 3 to 4 hours yesturday on one function to determine if two objects collided........trial and error till i got it right.....but it works great now.....


"Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time"
- Monty Python and the Holy Grail
themGames Productions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My first game was a 2-D fighting game and it completely sucked! The hit detection was awful, the controls stunk, and the artwork stunk worse than the controls. It impressed everyone who saw it but i was never happy with it. If I had to do it all over again I''d have done tetris first or something equally simple.

Big B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''m also a fan of the good ''ol Street Fighter games.
The SF2 Turbo for the SNES rocked so much. Anyway
making a Beat ''em up is not an easy task, not even for
good gameprogrammers. But sure try and try not to
be too disappointed if the project fails. A nibbly game
is a good thing to start with, but that''s just me.
I myself started with a nibbly kind of game in QBasic, then
a Tetris in C and so on..

Anyway good luck.




A guy who''s trying
to learn about videogameprogramming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, did you guys ever play "Stick Fighter".

Seriously, though, it depends on what kinds of games you want to do. If you like fighting games, which require collision detection (i.e. did that kick just land?), Pong uses the same concept. IMHO, Tetris isn''t a very instructive game to program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Try:
Space Invaders (learn sprite animation and movement)
Asteroids (learn floating point coordinates)
Defender/Scramble (learn Side Scrolling)
Pac Man (just for the hell of it, everyone else did)

Look at the old classics there are plenty of examples to work from. Get MAME32 (this is an arcade machine emulator) there are hundreds of arcade games to choose from.

Don't look to publish your first game if you have never written one, the chances are that you will set your sites to high, I did, many times, and fail.

Keep it simple and 'clone' an arcade game as an excercise. That way you can rip off thier sprites, sounds and gameplay, without having to produce them yourself, so that you can concentrate on programming.



Edited by - DeltaVee on June 21, 2000 3:47:31 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the input guys... I guess I''ll start with something simpler BTW Did any of you ever play any of the SNK/Neo Geo fighters? Awesome huge sprits (for the time). The gameplay and characters were basically rip off''s of SF2 but those sprites.. wow! I''m thinking a fast PC these days should be able to do that? (if the 10 year old Neo hardware could!) but then I am a beginner and know nothing


BTW, I already have MAME... very cool. That''s what I''ve been re-kindling my desire for the old Neo fighters on I''ll check out some of the older games (I just downloaded Splatter House for it - remember playing that on the ol'' PC Engine!)

Thanks
Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually bounding boxes do work, you define several small ones and check for each of them. This is what the mugen engine does.

What is mugen? Well check this out http://www.elecbyte.com/games/mugen/index.html




-------------------------
-Now Working on Pokemon like Engine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is a good idea to begin with a Zelda like? I mean, like in gameboy, oriented by squares?

Thanks, Arthur(rockslave)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why not do pixel perfect collision from the get go ?
IT is tough to implement at first, but when you get it working.......the benefits are great.......no more...."Ohhhh, that guy didn''t touch me !!!!!!"......because if you just use bounding boxes detection, especially with sprites that have alot of "empty space" in the bounding box area.......the collision detection will be crappy.......
so that it doesn''t slow your program to a crawl, you first do bounding box detection, then if the bounding boxes do collide then you let pixel perfect take control.......
And hey, if I could get it working then I am sure most people can.......although it did take a lot of sleepless hours

"Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time"
- Monty Python and the Holy Grail
themGames Productions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement