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Jacob84

Starting in the good direction...

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Hi!... First of all I''d like to say that is great that webs like that exists. I''m an student of computer science (First year now), so I have a bit of experience in C++ and OOP (2 years of experience). Now I''ve decided to try to learn something of graphics and games, but I don''t want to lose time. I mean, I will probably spent years to learn sufficient graphics to get good results, so I would like to get the most ''direct'' method possible. With this aim, there are questions that they aren''t answered: *** Graphics Library (OpenGL/DirectX) -> Is this an important question? I''m not sure, but I would like to have your opinion. I know something of OpenGL, but some people that is in the games sector have said me that today is better use DirectX tech, first of all, because of his 100% windows compatibility, and actual "order". *** .NET Framework -> You can like ms or hate it, but it seems to be true that ms technologies are the most used, the most popular and probably the tools that give you more professional oportunities. But over the new .NET Framework and new Visual Studio .NET I don''t know anything. It''s the future? It''s recommended to get Visual Studio .NET for good DirectX programation? It''s recommended for programation (Windows mainly) in ageneral way? *** Documentation & Tutorials -> I can''t understand it at the moment. Most of games that runs over windows use DirectX tech. But, the docs and tutorials that you can find over the internet are OpenGL oriented. Maybe it''s because of this is free and open. I''m downloading the DirectX 9.0 SDK...and... Is the documentation of the SDK good enough? Well, thanks all for reading, and if someone replys...thank you very much!!! Jacob.

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I think choosing between DirectX and OpenGL is really up to you. If you are going to be doing windows only then DirectX is good. Look through some examples of each aswell and see what you like better.

Learning from the SDK documentation would be very direct but probably also very difficult. I suppose if you have a good understanding you could learn from the documentation and the examples included with DirectX but I would recommend you get a book on it or try some of the tutorials on the internet.

A good DirectX tutorial site is: http://nexe.gamedev.net/News/News.asp

Good Luck!

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quote:
Original post by Jacob84
*** Graphics Library (OpenGL/DirectX) ->
Is this an important question?

No. Its been

Done to Death


quote:

*** .NET Framework ->
But over the new .NET Framework and new Visual Studio .NET I don''t know anything. It''s the future? It''s recommended to get Visual Studio .NET for good DirectX programation? It''s recommended for programation (Windows mainly) in ageneral way?


Even though its old by computer standards, its too new by language standards to tell yet. It shows some promise, but so far, IMHO, its only gained a good footing so far as a replacement for Java, although its intended to be more than just a Java replacement. WinForms are nicer than MFC, and DirectX for .Net is promised to be ''cleaner'' than regular DirectX.

Of course, all the prevous is based on Personal Experiance or things I''ve heard, your milage may vary.
quote:

*** Documentation & Tutorials ->
I can''t understand it at the moment. Most of games that runs over windows use DirectX tech. But, the docs and tutorials that you can find over the internet are OpenGL oriented. Maybe it''s because of this is free and open. I''m downloading the DirectX 9.0 SDK...and... Is the documentation of the SDK good enough?


Microsoft''s Tutorials are pretty well fleshed out. In fact, a lot of books by certian ''authors'' are usually accused of being rip offs of the free stuff for DirectX.

OpenGL doesn''t have as many free tutorials, so people make their own and post them on web sites.

OpenGL isn''t ''open source'' its just an open standard. It''s free for developers, but not for manufacturers. NVidia and ATI pay for the right to make OpenGL compatable cards.

Oh yeah, games are about 40/60 OpenGL/Direct3D. DirectX is everything, OpenGL & Direct3D is just graphics. As long as ID continues to produce OpenGL games, I believe OpenGL will continue to be a force in the market.

~~~~~
"That has to be the most impressive collection of blatently incorrect statements I''ve seen on these boards for a while." -benjamin bunny
Download and play Slime King I.

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Well, Jacob, I assume you program for Windows, so if you plan on making games, then you will need to know the Windows API (which wasn''t mentioned in your post, so I''m not sure whether you know it or not). If you don''t use the Windows API (which allows portability), then you wont be able to use DirectX.




quote:
Original post by Jacob84


*** Graphics Library (OpenGL/DirectX) ->

Is this an important question? I''m not sure, but I would like to have your opinion. I know something of OpenGL, but some people that is in the games sector have said me that today is better use DirectX tech, first of all, because of his 100% windows compatibility, and actual "order".



DirectX doesn''t have "order", I assure you . There are many patches and updates for DirectX 9.0, such as the recent one where a hacker could use a hole in DirectSound to gain complete admin access to a system. Most of the tutorials for DirectX... is the SDK. It is a pretty large download, and it has good examples, but for someone new to DirectX and Graphic APIs in general... the SDK is less than desirable. On the other hand, there are GREAT tutorials for OpenGL, the most notable as Nehe.Gamedev.net. DirectX is also constantly updated, so when your halfway through a longer project, you might end up using an outdated API. There is no difference in the technology DirectX and OpenGL uses. They are both extremely fast and compatible with almost every video card. DirectX is also not only a Graphics API. Direct3D (or DirectGraphics, they keep changing the names with every version arrggh) is. Your friend is wrong, OpenGL has ccomplete 100% Windows compatibility (through some Windows functions for OpenGL (isn''t that nice of Microsoft)), and is compatible with other OSes such as Linux etc.

I don''t know much about the .NET framework, but I plan to stay away from it (I don''t see any bonuses, just negatives).

Thats all I can say from my knowledge.

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Hi!

Very cool to see how this forum works. It''s very hard to see a post without an answer.

So in this case, I''d like to thank Xtreme11, dede and Certified Bomb.

To Xtreme11, just thanks for the link. It seems to be very cool. Thanks also to dede, your opinions about .NET are very apreciated. And to Certified Bomb, just say that I have some practice with WAPI32, so I hope this won''t be a problem, and talking ''bout the order in DirectX, just say that I''m starting to think that order in computers doesn''t exists.

Thanks!!!

Jacob.

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