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Is the new Visual Basic.net viable for making simple games?

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I''ve read that the compiled code in VB.net is just or nearly as fast as Visual C++.net code now. I already program daily in Visual Basic 6 but not for gaming purposes, mainly front end UI''s for SQL or Oracle databases and was wondering whether moving to VB.net is viable as a simple game platform (tile based engines) rather than having to learn a powerful language such as C or C++. Any comments appreciated. Thanks Artix

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A language is a tool, a tool can be used for anything. There exists 2d platform games written in QBasic.

Not to talk you out of it, but C++ is a bit more flexable, but if you don''t mind losing a little bit of flexablility, then you should be fine.

~~~~~
"Video games could have prevented this tragety." - mortisthecat
Download and play Slime King I.

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You can make games with it. Visual BASIC .NET, or VB.NET, is a decent language. It has DirectX support, so you will have no problem creating games. Be aware that VB.NET programmers make a little less than C/C++ or other OOP programmers. They are also sometimes not appreciated that much. I have never used it, but it looks great.

Scott Simontis
C++ Programmer

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I''m sure VB.Net is viable as a simple game platform. Something to bear in mind, however, is that VB.Net is very different from VB6. Everything runs within the .Net framework and uses the .Net base classes. You''d have to learn all this and then learn managed DirectX.

This might not be a bad thing. Some .Net experience is bound to be useful to you, being a VB6 programmer by trade (me too - lucky us!) but I don''t think learning C++ and DirectX would require much more effort. C++ is just another language and, already being a programmer, you will understand most of the concepts easily.

I guess what I''m saying is don''t expect to be up-and-running within minutes if you choose VB.Net, and don''t look at C++ as a difficult language that will be hard to learn. I find it to be a fairly simple, elegant and powerful language.

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quote:
Original post by Village Specialton
Be aware that VB.NET programmers make a little less than C/C++ or other OOP programmers.

Says who? That''s a general statement that is not applicable in all cases. I''d be willing to be that I make as much or more than C++ programmers. I''m making substantially more now doing VB.NET programming than I was doing C++ programming less than a year ago. Of course, I''m doing business programming now and was doing game programming then, so perhaps it''s not a valid comparison. Still, I was making more than the average VB business programmer according to the annual VBPJ survey even though I was doing game programming.

quote:
Original post by Village Specialton
They are also sometimes not appreciated that much.

Perhaps by ignorant biased fanboys, but not by anyone with a bit of maturity.

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quote:
Original post by BlueTongue
I''ve read that the compiled code in VB.net is just or nearly as fast as Visual C++.net code now. I already program daily in Visual Basic 6 but not for gaming purposes, mainly front end UI''s for SQL or Oracle databases and was wondering whether moving to VB.net is viable as a simple game platform (tile based engines) rather than having to learn a powerful language such as C or C++.

Having done both VB.NET and C++ programming for games I have to say that VB.NET has an advantage in ease of use and speed of development, at least for me. For small hobby games I see no reason to learn C++. If you are planning on moving to VB.NET for business programming anyway I would suggest just sticking with it for creating small games as well. It''s greatly different than VB6, but I picked up the basics in a matter of days.

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quote:
Original post by BlueTongue
I''ve read that the compiled code in VB.net is just or nearly as fast as Visual C++.net code now. I already program daily in Visual Basic 6 but not for gaming purposes, mainly front end UI''s for SQL or Oracle databases and was wondering whether moving to VB.net is viable as a simple game platform (tile based engines) rather than having to learn a powerful language such as C or C++.

Any comments appreciated.

Thanks

Artix


I don''t see why not. I wrote fallen elements in VB...

------------------------------------------------------------
Timothy Barnes | War Charity | 2003.

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Thanks for the comments guys, I had no idea VB.net was that much different from VB6. Seen as I will probably have to make the move to VB.net anyway (work wise) I''ll stick with it and see what I can come up with Hobby game wise.

In regards to Visual Basic Programmers not making as much money as C++ programmers I tend to disagree, It all depends on what sort of apps you are building. My best mate is a C++ programmer, he builds billing systems for utility companies. I build database front ends for Utility companies. I earn nearly twice as much as he does

Thanks again for the comments

Artix

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