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Wings Of Icarus

Visual C++ , Visual Studio.net

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.net is the newer version, it''s version 7 (also called 2002 now) it comes with support for the .net framework right out of the box. VC++ was last branded as 6.0, service pack 5 is the latest update. The .net framework is available for free for VC++ from Microsoft''s website. .net support is the biggest difference between the two, although I hear Visual studio.net is more inline with the ANSI standard as well. VC++ 6 is perfectly fine, many places still use it, although they are beginning to move over to .net

Ravyne, NYN Interactive Entertainment
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Uhm, I'm no MS-product specialist, so correct me if I'm wrong:

Visual Studio.net 2003 is the whole .net development suite, including Visual C++ 2003, optimizer, C#, VB, and lots of other tools.

Visual C++ 2003 is the standalone version, the same as the one included in VS.net, but without the optimizer.

I'm not sure, if you can do managed C++ with the later, or if you need the full VS.net suite for that.

BTW: VC6 and .net 2002 are both outdated, AFAIK.


[edited by - Yann L on August 5, 2003 5:20:02 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Yann L
Uhm, I''m no MS-product specialist, so correct me if I''m wrong:

Visual Studio.net 2003 is the whole .net development suite, including Visual C++ 2003, optimizer, C#, VB, and lots of other tools.

Visual C++ 2003 is the standalone version, the same as the one included in VS.net, but without the optimizer.

I''m not sure, if you can do managed C++ with the later, or if you need the full VS.net suite for that.



Thats right. Yes, you can do managed C++ with just the standalone version, version 2003 even has the Windows Forms designer (2002 didn''t, I was back to counting pixels...)

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The main differences to a programmer not bothering about C#, managed extensions and such are:

1. for loop scope fixed
2. Compiler improvements
3. User interface redone

Personally, i prefer .net ( but then I dont have a choice, work does .net and so must I ) :-)

// Per

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From www.provantage.com site in .net 2003 std. overview, it''s the second bullet point:

"Create Highly Tuned Unmanaged Windows-based Applications & Components - Write and compile unmanaged x86 code. Speed up your application or reduce its size with optimization options for a range of processors, including Whole Program Optimization, and support for Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) and Streaming SIMD Extensions 2 (SSE2) instruction sets."

http://www.provantage.com/buy-22077980-microsoft-development-tools-visual-c-net-v2003-standard-shopping.htm

Anyone here with a real physical copy of the compiler that can confirm or deny this?

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quote:
Original post by JD
From www.provantage.com site in .net 2003 std. overview, it''s the second bullet point:

"Create Highly Tuned Unmanaged Windows-based Applications & Components - Write and compile unmanaged x86 code. Speed up your application or reduce its size with optimization options for a range of processors, including Whole Program Optimization, and support for Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) and Streaming SIMD Extensions 2 (SSE2) instruction sets."

http://www.provantage.com/buy-22077980-microsoft-development-tools-visual-c-net-v2003-standard-shopping.htm

Anyone here with a real physical copy of the compiler that can confirm or deny this?


Yes, but only with the full version of Visual Studio.net. C++.NET standard comes with the non-optimizing compiler. Supposedly when Microsoft recompiled AoE2 with whole program optimization, they got a speed increase of about 10%. Also C++.net comes with new run time error checking stuff.

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