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Metus

What's the difference between...

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.. a good c++ programmmer and a great c++ programmer? I''ve finished my first year at the game programming course here in sweden and i''m just about to start the second year involving direct3d. Don''t get me wrong here, this isn''t a game programming question. The first year of our course, we had only a couple of weeks of basic c++ training, and i find that really annoying; i don''t wanna be a pure game programmer; i wanna be a great c++ programmer that''s programming games. The first c++ book i ever picked up was the 3''rd edition of Stephen Prata''s "C++ Programming" (word-by-word translation of the swedish ook title) and i''ve just picked up Bjarne Stroustrup''s "The C++ Programming Language - Special Ed.". I find the TCPL book very interesting and deep-digging in c++ and i''m really amazed over the effectiveness in STL (we had no STL training at all in our course) so i really wanna focus on good c++ programming techniques, not "Game C++". Holy mother of all rabbits, this post went long, sorry ''bout that, guess i lost the point somewhere in the swamp of bullsh*t Soo.. What is the actual difference between an average (or good) C++ programmer and the great C++ programmer, and how can I become a Great programmer? Thank you for the time you wasted reading my post

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Can''t tell you the difference, but you can also take a look at Josutti''s books (no, I don''t have amazon.com shares).

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See where you rank and help yourself to improve at www.topcoder.com. They have weekly programming tournaments. You are given a set of three problems (easy/medium/hard) and have 75 minutes to solve them all. Your score on the problems is based on your time. The faster you solve them, the higher your score.

After this you enter a challenge phase where you can look at other coders' solutions in your room ( a room is generally 10-20 coders ). If you see a coder submitted a solution that would fail with a given input you can challenge his code with that input. If you succede you gain 50 points and he loses all his points for that problem, if you fail you lose 50 points.

Finally after the challenge phase is the system test phase. Here all problems are intensively tested against test cases meant to make your program fail if it has even one mistake. If you fail a problem you lose all points.

Very basic premises but its amazingly fun and addictive. On top of that you can get a chance to meet a large number of people who love programming which is always fun. The next TopCoder tournament is tonight at 9pm eastern actually! Hope to see you there. Its free of course.

EDIT: As far as my personal opinion ( and reality ) goes. No book is going to make you a better programmer. Programming is a skill that is improved from practice, practice and practice. Just like a basketball player doesn't become a better player by sitting around reading about good basketball style, you're not going to become a better programmer sitting around reading about good programming style.

[edited by - haro on August 6, 2003 6:55:36 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
the difference is:

a good programmer thinks they''re great
a great programmer knows they have a lot to learn

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The same difference between the average anything and the great anything. Average anything just doit. Great anything also love to do it, and to do it perfectly. And he does it 25 hours a day, 8 days a week, 366 days a year.

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A good C++ programmer gets the task done... a great C++ programmer gets it done efficiently.

Let me elaborate:
A good programmer will be able to get things to run properly, yet a great programmer will not only get it to run properly, but they will have used the tools available to them to get it done. They know the difference of when and when not to use the tools available, while the average programmer isn''t worried about that, he''s worried about getting it working. I''m an optimization freak, and I really dislike using other peoples code for stuff, so I re-write most of the stuff that I need that will be time critical instead of relying on someone elses implementation, but at the same time, I''m not going to write my own sound library, since a pretty efficient one has been written for me . I *have* written my own sound engines before (good old sound blaster compatible DOS .wav player that interfaced the hardware directly), but that was before we had nice libraries that do everything but make the game for us.

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As another note. You've got a country's reputation at stake if you sign up for TopCoder. Sweden has by far the highest overall rating average for a country. One of the best coders at TopCoder comes from Sweden, Yarin. He has actually been #1 before.

[edited by - haro on August 6, 2003 7:01:09 AM]

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quote:
Original post by xaxa
And he does it 25 hours a day, 8 days a week, 366 days a year.


I wanna live in your world !

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If there was something you could do to bridge the gap just like that, then there would be no gap.

To answer your question: humility, clarity, and experience. Initiative is a big plus too.

quote:
And he does it 25 hours a day, 8 days a week, 366 days a year.

That is utter nonsense. The notion that you must do something ''all the time'' is a surefire recipe for burnout in later years. Additionally, you''ll hit physical limitations pretty quick, such as eye strain, tension in your arms/wrists. You have far more to gain by living a balanced life rather than trying to be the best programmer that ever lived.

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quote:
Original post by antareus
If there was something you could do to bridge the gap just like that, then there would be no gap.

To answer your question: humility, clarity, and experience. Initiative is a big plus too.

quote:
And he does it 25 hours a day, 8 days a week, 366 days a year.

That is utter nonsense. The notion that you must do something ''all the time'' is a surefire recipe for burnout in later years. Additionally, you''ll hit physical limitations pretty quick, such as eye strain, tension in your arms/wrists. You have far more to gain by living a balanced life rather than trying to be the best programmer that ever lived.


It was a metaphor, sherlock. You must expend a lot of time to master into something. No matter if it is violin, boxing or programming.

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