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topsy_sweden

what compiler for assembler?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Just to clear up a few terms:
quote:
From FOLDOC
assembly language
(Or "assembly code" A symbolic representation of the machine language of a specific processor.

assembler
A program which converts assembly language into machine code.

compiler
A program that converts another program from some source language (or programming language) to machine language (object code). Some compilers output assembly language which is then converted to machine language by a separate assembler.


So I guess you really wanted to ask: "What is the most common assembler?". To answer that, you have to tell us what processor you''re using.

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Most assemblers do use a crapload of macros and stuff...

Yeah, I don''t know what processor you are using, or OS for that matter.

My favorite compiler is NASM though. It''s for 80386+ AFAIK.

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Doh!
P4 is based on x86

And no, You don't need a linker, assemblers usually do the linking...

[edited by - Nik02 on August 13, 2003 5:22:09 AM]

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Exacly, the P4 uses the same instructionsset as the 80386.. NASM is the best choice, I would say

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Well, you need a linker if you want to write EXE files, the Assembler assemble the ASM code you written to machine, and normaly stores it in a COM file, but the COM file can be executed like any EXE file.. so no, you don''t need a linker

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Well, microsoft still have MASM 6.13 if you can find it ... it USED to be the most popular assembler until microsoft orphaned it years ago

Borland has always had a good assembler (TASM) ... which I liked back when I used assembler a little (5 years ago) ... a basic version of it used to come with there C++ programming tools as well - and you could integrate the full vesion quite well

NASM is the open source x86 assembler of choice I think .. and seems to be the only common assembler still being developed today (although I am sure Intel has there own optimizing assembler as part of there C/C++ compiler suite ... I''m not sure what AMD does about it''s instruction sets?)

In fact, the official x86 command codes, we''re simply whatever intel chose to call them in each version of it''s assembler ... since, almost by definition, intel exposed new instructions via it''s assembler and that was the defacto standard for their pnemonics - I assume they still do such ...

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MASM is not orphaned, although they aren''t selling it separately any more. There''s an updated version (7.x) included with Visual Studio .NET. A version also used to be, and probably still is, included with the DDK.

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If you are using Visual C++ you could write parts that are not time-critical in c++ and time-critical parts in asm.

try this:



void MyAssemblyFunction()
{
// Put C++ Code here

__asm
{
// Put ASM code here


}

// Put more C++ code here

}



----------------------------------------------
Petter Nordlander

"There are only 10 kinds of people in the world. The who understand binary and those who don''t"

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