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CProgrammer

8051 microcontroller series or microcontrollers in general

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I am looking for a starter kit for robotics programming. I have been doing some research and have found SDCC to be a descent c compiler for the 8051 series. Any ideas were i can order a good starter kit for a hobbiist robotics programmer(i prefer c programmable microcontroller or if absolutely necessary assembler). Until now the 8051 seemed nice to me but i couldnt find a good well described and easy to order kit yet. Any help is much apreciated. -CProgrammer

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Hobby kits usually consists of so-called 'BASIC Stamps' which are a uController and a PROM burned with a BASIC interpreter - like an old Commodore 64.

To program a PIC or uC using assembly or C you need to be able to either burn a PROM and build a small circuit board, or most such devices today have from 4k to 512k of integrated permanent storage.
You have to have the right burner for the chips you're working with - all burners will work with a large number of chips, but not any possible chip you get your hands on. The burners cost from $100 to $300 or so.

Programming in C means you need a compiler, and these are generally not free either - they cost alot more than the burners do ($1000's). You can't use any ol' C/C++ compiler, you need one made for the chip you are writing code for, and one made to produce file that can be burned on to it (Windows compilers produce PE files, Linux compilers produce ELF files, you need just the raw code).

Now, I'm seen plans out there for building a burner yourself out of stuff you can buy at Radio Shack (don't buy crap there*) for Microchip PIC's (because PS2 hackers use them to defeat the boot protection). I've never seen one work with my own eyes though.

gcc is a free compiler (if you didn't know), odds are fair it's been retargetted at a given uC (I'm almost certain there's a port for the 8051).

*It's rudely expensive. For the cost of the stuff you have to buy to make a burner, you could fill a chest full of misc. eletronic bits - you can however get it today and not wait a week.

[edited by - Magmai Kai Holmlor on August 13, 2003 11:40:32 PM]

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SDCC is quite nice compiler for c51 -series, however it doesn''t produce as fast code as keil''s (commercial, expensive but good) and does have some bugs that can be quite troublesome to find.

(E(E))PROM Programmer may not be necessary; I''d recommend using Atmel''s c51-compatible ISP (in-system-programmable) chips. Programming cable is *very* easy to make (granted, your schematic must support it, mainly the resistor between vcc and rst must be large enough); cable itself has only two resistors (email me for details).

Starter kits vary however, I don''t know much of them since I haven''t really ever used one (being EE major and hobbyist for ages helps, so haven''t had any need.) Cheap ones aren''t very expensive though, I think you can get quite basic kit for some $100-$200. I''d look at atmel''s selection again, they have at least one demo board (quite simple, but helps to get basics right - I couldn''t find list price though). Those don''t help with robotics, though.

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My opinions only

8051 too expensive.
I have the Stamp from parallax, great fun, code in basic.
I have seen on ebay a "Microchip" pic setup with c compiler for £39, i have been very tempted.

My plan is to use pic chips for physically small projects and old motherboards for larger projects, such as building an r2d2.

The advantage of using, say a p133 is the compatability with modern software and compilers and storage.
Of course the power supply becomes an issue. my plan is to use a bike battery and an 12v to 240v inverter.

...so far i have only flashed a few leds from the parallel port, my motor control circuits have not being too succesful.


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I've used several varieties of basic stamp and PIC chip, and I must say I favor the PIC chip. Microengineering Labs sells a very affordable PIC programmer and BASIC compiler. Or you could just use assemble (I've only dabbled in it, I prefer the 99% basic-stamp compatible PicBasic). PIC chips support in-circuit serial programming. Many PIC chips come in a flash variant, so there's no need to play with ultraviolet EPROM erasers or one-time-programmable chips. A pic chip will cost from $4 to $12 depending on the model you choose (PIC16F84A is my fav... $6). Of course prices drop in quantity. My startup system was a little over $200, if memory serves. I got the programmer for $50, I think the compiler was $100 and I spent about $85 on PIC chips (it's cheaper to buy 25 at digikey than it is to buy 15).

EDIT: fixed link

--------------------


You are not a real programmer until you end all your sentences with semicolons; (c) 2000 ROAD Programming

You are unique. Just like everybody else.

"Mechanical engineers design weapons; civil engineers design targets."
"Sensitivity is adjustable, so you can set it to detect elephants and other small creatures." -- Product Description for a vibration sensor

Yanroy@usa.com

[edited by - Yanroy on August 14, 2003 11:49:38 AM]

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For the microchip pic option the best idea is to build a simple programmer yourself, I use the JDM84 one + icprog for the software to program it initially then use one of the many bootloaders to program it afterwards. It saves a lot of time to do it that way. The 18F series is the best bet for development these days, the higher maximum clock rate, flat memory space, extra instructions, etc all make it much nicer to use that the older ones.



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Thanks for all your help guys really apreciate it.
I think ill search in atmels c51''s selection first.
They seem to be widely compatible, reprogrammable and dont only support BASIC, cause i just dont want to learn a new language for it.

Thanks again.

-CProgrammer

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quote:
Original post by DefCom
The Microchip starterkit that looks good, $36 (US) or £39 in UK, so how many dollars to the pound then????

Microchip




Wow this offer really does look good and all that for just 36$.
Thanks DefCom

-CProgrammer

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I always knew about microcontrollers like basic stamp and then a few of the c ones because i was trying to make a computer interface to my train.

I never really thought about actualy trying to interface a modern processor. Is it possible? Does anyone have any link?

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