Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

pws

denstiy of water

Recommended Posts

pws    122
Does any-one know what values can the density of the water be? I know it depends of the kind of water. What are the differnet options?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EvilProgrammer    122
What kind of water are you talking about? For water, I would just use an object with blending over the terrain. For this, to set the density, that would just mean adjusting the alpha value and slowing down objects as they move through it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EvilProgrammer    122
I''m just talking about alpha blending. After you enable alpha blending, and set the depth buffer to read only, you can use glColor4f(r,g,b, alpha), where the alpha value is between 0.0f and 1.0f . A good value for water is something like 0.6f . I''m sure you can find a good alpha blending tutorial somewhere explaining this more in depth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wildfire    154
quote:
Entrez-PubMed

The three site-site partial structure factors for water have been measured as a function of pressure, using neutron diffraction, at a temperature of 268 K. It is found that the measured structure functions imply a continuous transformation with increasing pressure from a low-density form of water ( rho(L) approximately 0.0295 molecules/A(3)), with an open, hydrogen-bonded tetrahedral structure, to a high-density form of water ( rho(H) approximately 0.0402 molecules/A(3)), with nontetrahedral O-O-O angles and a collapsed second coordination shell, which implies broken hydrogen bonds between the first and second coordination shells.



EvilProgrammer, he said density not translucency.

I know my answer will be pretty much useless to you. But, I know this will sound harsh, your question is a joke.

Take one of your old schoolbooks on physics or chemistry, and you'll find the exact answer to that question. If you don't own any of these, look the answer up on GOOGLE. You should be able to find the answer pretty easily.

Next time, at least try to include information as to why you need the answer. If you'd've told something like "I want to be able to simulate water for this and that reason", you might get better solutions.

And, what does the density of water have to do with OpenGL? Shouldn't you rather be posting this in the Maths and Physics forum?

[edited by - Wildfire on August 14, 2003 4:53:30 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites