Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ehsen

Best C++ compiler

Recommended Posts

Which C++ development envoirenment is good. Actually i want a gui envorenment which shows the properties of object as in visual basic. Example: text1.list of properties Ehsen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Visual Studio .NET, Visual C++ 6.0 and Dev-C++ all do what you want. .NET is great if you have the money, if not, I recommend using Dev-C++ (which is free).


"Shinji woke up in the bath and screamed loudly.
He immediately checked for the presence of his manhood and
sighed in relief when he confirmed it was still attached."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Err, you might be best of sticking with VB then. Visual C++ uses either Win32API or MFC and is very confusing when you have previously done something like Delphi or VB. It does have a kinda visual form designer, but there is a lot more coding required as far as I know. (I have always given up and gone back to delphi) I use Visual C++ for developing with DirectX so I don''t need all those properties and things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by hammerstein_02
Err, you might be best of sticking with VB then. Visual C++ uses either Win32API or MFC and is very confusing when you have previously done something like Delphi or VB. It does have a kinda visual form designer, but there is a lot more coding required as far as I know. (I have always given up and gone back to delphi) I use Visual C++ for developing with DirectX so I don''t need all those properties and things.


Wrong. You can use the .NET framework with C++ and the VS.NET IDE.



"Yeah, I would''ve killed you, but I''m glad I didn''t - the paperwork is a bitch"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It depends on your budget. If you have the money, get Microsoft Visual C++ .NET Standard 2003. If you want the professional version, you can probably find it on ebay. Another choice is Borland Enterprise C++. You can download a trial from the Borland site. Borland also offers a free version of their compiler, with no IDE. Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 is very hard to find, but if you find it, it should be cheaper than any of the other compilers you need to pay for. I am currently using it on one computer, and it is very good. If you don''t have any money, you can try djgpp, a Windows version of gcc. Get it at DJ Delorie''s Site. Or, you can try Dev-C++. It is a very nice IDE based off of mingW. I use it, and it is very nice. Plus, the e-mail user group is very friendly and helpful. Get it at Bloodshed.net.

Scott Simontis
e-mail:ageofscott@comcast.net
AIM:ssimontis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by rohde
quote:
Original post by hammerstein_02
Err, you might be best of sticking with VB then. Visual C++ uses either Win32API or MFC and is very confusing when you have previously done something like Delphi or VB. It does have a kinda visual form designer, but there is a lot more coding required as far as I know. (I have always given up and gone back to delphi) I use Visual C++ for developing with DirectX so I don''t need all those properties and things.


Wrong. You can use the .NET framework with C++ and the VS.NET IDE.



"Yeah, I would''ve killed you, but I''m glad I didn''t - the paperwork is a bitch"


I''ve never played with .NET, but I''ve found MFC and Win32''s API to be very confusing. Prepare to meet the horror that is Hungarian notation... D8E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by sSimontis
Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 is very hard to find, but if you find it, it should be cheaper than any of the other compilers you need to pay for. I am currently using it on one computer, and it is very good.


I wouldn't say that it is "very good" (regarding conformance), or at least it is not worth paying the money for it, considering the other compilers/IDEs currently available.


I would recommend Microsoft Visual C++ .NET 2003 if you have the money. As already mentioned, MinGW ("Minimalistic GNU for Windows" - a port of GCC) is very good, and Bloodshed provide a nice IDE. There are a number of good, free compilers, some of which have been mentioned. Have a look around on the Internet.

[ Google || Start Here || ACCU || STL || Boost || MSDN || GotW || MSVC++ Library Fixes || BarrysWorld || E-Mail Me ]

[edited by - Lektrix on September 1, 2003 6:54:43 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by FtMonkey
If you have the $ then VC .NET if you don''t and want a good IDE and compiler Dev-C++...


VC++ .NET only costs about 100$, I don''t think that''s much for an IDE with compiler. But I still prefer mingw

"My basic needs in life are food, love and a C++ compiler"
[Project AlterNova] [Novanet]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For those of you who use Linux (I know, small audience :D ), I''ve found KDevelop to be a nice tool. As far as keeping track of objects goes, it keeps all your classes in a tree-view, making navigating to class declarations & methods & such very easy. Right now I''m using KDevelop 2.1.5 (the official stable version) though I''m thinking of test driving KDevelop 3.0 (in alpha) because I keep hearing good things about it.

KDevelop is really only a front end - it uses standard Unix/Linux tools including gcc, automake, autoconf, etc. to do the acutal compiling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites