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Lucidquiet

oh so many source editors, and the people who love them.

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Lucidquiet    199
Well, I have been toying with the idea of writing my own source editor, so that it works something like the way I want, and so that I can understand/implement my own way of handling things like project files. But the thought occured to me that maybe I haven''t looked hard enough at other source code editors, maybe there is one that runs the way I would like...a good balance of GUI and command-line. So, anybody, what is your source editor of choice, and why do you prefer it to others? L- " ''No one has control -- control is just a fantasy. And being human is difficult.'' "

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daerid    354
For C/C++/C#/VB.NET I use VS.NET 2003
For pretty much everything else I use EditPlus

Currently I''m in the design stages of writing my own editor, just because EditPlus isn''t quite powerful enough

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flangazor    516
Textpad is quite good. When confronted with an xterm, I use vi.

Writing a text editor is both challenging and rewarding. I suggest doing it anyway if you are stuck for what sort of project you might like to take on.

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tortoise    122
I love Eclipse so much it makes me think twice about programming in languages other than Java :D (and the somewhat scary part is I''m not entirely joking).

Otherwise I use Crimson Editor for most things, or Visual.NET for C# and MS oriented C++.

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daerid    354
Just so you know, CrimsonEditor is a blatant rip of EditPlus (just look at the options dialog for each editor side by side).

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daerid    354
quote:
Original post by tortoise
Many programs are blatant rips of other programs, doesn't reduce their usability. Crimson is free, EditPlus isn't. So it wins by default


Yes, but crimson is inferior, and Edit+ is $30.

However, I'd <3 to get my hands on Crimson Editor source

[edited by - daerid on September 3, 2003 7:04:55 PM]

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PmanC    134
EditPlus. by the way, i'm on my 918 day of a 30 day trial period! lol -PmanC

[edited by - PmanC on September 3, 2003 7:09:16 PM]

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sazzer    122
There''s a program I found called jEdit which is a Java based one with hundreds of plugins to do anything you want...

On saying that, I use UltraEdit for my coding normally, or Vi if it''s a very quick change to something...

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
KDevelop and the occasional VI. You can''t go wrong with OSS, heh

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raven_soul    122
I''m currently programming my own editor for the language PBASIC. It''s not a big-known language. I''m coding it in MFC.

My only editor of choice is VC++ 6.0 Enterprise. I used to use .NET, but then I left that (.NET was to together).

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Emexus    142
Hey, Jankey
How do you set up vc++ 6.0 to have a black background and white letters?? becouse thats how i used to have my borland compiler set up and didnt think it was possible to do it with vc++! im very intrested to know if you could please tell me

cheers

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Ekim_Gram    418
quote:
Original post by Emexus
Hey, Jankey
How do you set up vc++ 6.0 to have a black background and white letters?? becouse thats how i used to have my borland compiler set up and didnt think it was possible to do it with vc++! im very intrested to know if you could please tell me

cheers



Go to Tools > Options > Scroll left all the way to Format and then choose your colors.




R.I.P. Mark Osback
Solo Pa Mi Gente

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Lucidquiet    199
I''ve been thinking that Emacs is the most powerful source editor -- barnone. However, it looks crappy. But aesthetics aside. I don''t know if it can show resource trees, with something other than text display. Is it a capable of project/package management? (ie. Can you rename symbols.) Will it show dependencies, stuff like that, or is it the reason you have lisp at your disposal. But also the regular expression utility is like looking at a line of backslashes, so many escapes.

Someone has got to have an opinion!

L-

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gameCoder_STB    122
jEdit isn''t bad, opensource java editor that supports formatting of many different language syntax as well as built in XML support and a plethora of other plug-ins to accomplish many other things.

http://jedit.org/

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sQuid    149
I love vim.

The best thing about vim is that even the simplest things require a cryptic combination of keystokes so you get a sense of achievement from doing anything.

Somehow I have managed to learn a scary amount of vim commands, and using any other text editor just annoys the crap out of me nowadays.


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tortoise    122
quote:
Original post by sQuid
The best thing about vim is that even the simplest things require a cryptic combination of keystokes so you get a sense of achievement from doing anything.



I get this strange sense of achievement when my text editor allows me to effortlessly get my work done, but that's just me

Nah, The VIs aren't that bad, but I couldn't imagine using them for a large project.

[edited by - tortoise on September 4, 2003 9:31:29 PM]

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Flarelocke    410
It takes some doing to get it set up correctly, but I like Vim. (most people mean vim when they say they like vi) I also would like to second the vote for scite. I use that for my editing under windows (there are windows and linux versions of both vim and scite, but scite works better under windows and vim works better under vi). I also occassionally use gvim (gtk+ version of vim; comes with vim most of time), gedit (gnome''s version of notepad; also has syntax highlighting. I usually use it when I''ve screwed up one of my other editors somehow), or nano (mostly nano for random configuration files -- it''s my distro''s default editor and I keep forgetting to change root''s .bashrc to update $EDITOR).

Vim is easy to use, once you know that a) you start in "command mode", where you have various one letter commands that usually take arguments (i.e. ''x'' deletes a character, but "10x" deletes 10 characters, starting at the cursor), b) the ''.'' command is really useful, and c)":help" tells you everything you ever wanted to know about vim.

I have also been thinking of writing my own editor, though. Vim is great, but it doesn''t integrate with other tools very well, AFAIK. (not a problem with multiple terminal windows or vterms for most programs with which you might want to integrate, but gdb is a special exception) It''s user interface''s relatively steep learning curve somewhat bothers me. I''d like to see what I could do to improve that.

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