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Silvermyst

So, what is YOUR idea of how to incorporate real rp-elements into a computer game?

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So, what is YOUR idea of how to incorporate real rpg into a computer game? With everyone (including me) complaining that computer rpgames like Everquest and Ultima Online do not offer enough room to roleplay, what type of setup would give us the opportunity to roleplay more in our computer games? How would you design a real roleplaying game? (and as we probably all know/suspect, with the computer technology these days, a true rp computer game is pretty much beyond our reach, but maybe when we can figure out how to make a rpg in theory, we can then then steer technology in a course towards that) edit: Hm, darn that, can't edit the title of the post to make it short enough to fit Edited by - Silvermyst on 6/30/00 11:38:18 AM
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Well look at the pen and paper role play games that promote actual role play as opposed to leveling. Vampire (the p&p game) gives out points to the best roleplayer and the best actor each session. There''s no real xp on offer for those who just slaughter mindlessly (unless that _is_ their character) only for those who roleplay, act their character and learn new things each story.
To allow this you need some way of determining who has done the best roleplaying which means either having a permanent ref watching each party (possible in LAN games, impossible in On-line games) or have people nominated for role playing by fellow players (hugely open to abuse).

The only way to get roleplaying into roleplaying games is to take the leveling players out of them. The only way to do this is to remove the levels and only leave in that which defines character.

A skill based system would be a start because what you can do helps define your character and promotes roleplaying. With a skill based system you are defined as more than just a 34th level warrior, you are more of an individual.

At one extreme you could remove all concept of experience completely and have characters who only change in terms of their personality. Their stats remain static. That would almost guarentee to attract roleplaying players. But I doubt there''s enough of them interested to be able to call it massively multiplayer.

Out of that barrage of meandering thought I think that having small parties with refs on LAN system will be the only possible solution.

Off the top of my head that is :-)

Mike
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For online RPGs, I think one thing that would be very useful is a player-run society. Just letting a society dynamically become altered by the players in the game would be very powerful. Like if players were forced to build cities and organizations from scratch. The type of player that is a leader would probably be pretty high in the society structure. Not so much like UO. UO just doesn't have a cohesive sense of community. More of a chance for organized player-run goverment, or some areas could be ruled by total anarchy. Just some ideas....

Edited by - Nazrix on June 30, 2000 1:09:05 PM
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Yeah, it would be difficult, but if it worked out right...People would realize not everyone is fit to be the big king of the town. Some people have leadership skills, or more accurately some people can perhaps better roleplay a leader and therefore would be higher in the social structure. The people who like battles could be part of the military or a knight. Or just a bandit raiding the cities. There would be a place for different types of players...yeah, that kinda sounds like an interesting idea...just sort of came out of nowhere
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