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asdasd12345

How much C++ do u have to know to make a game?

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Hello. I am a total computer noob. I know a little Java, and I have bought Object Oriented Programming in C++ which I am in CH.4 (Structures). I am wondering how much information about function, structures, ect, I need to know before I can make simple games like Pac-man, Tetris, ect. Eventually I want to make games to play on a GB Advance.

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Guest Anonymous Poster

or you can ignore complicated API''s like that and use more simple alternatives like SDL.. Or just do what I do, don''t try to know everything, but keep checking reference materials it''s likely to be more accurate than your memory (if your like me..)

I think they call it RTFM or something read the f''ing manuals if you don''t know something..

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theres really no limit...you can always learn more...may it not be the syntax but the way it is done thatmakes it quicker and better...so really you need to know as much as possiable to make a game.

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You don''t have to know any C++ if you just decide to use another language instead.


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About half of the book I say. Plain vanilla C will do. It won''t be a pretty design but it''ll work for a small 2D game. I think the 2D part will be dominant, especially art. Pack man will be harder to do than tetris because of more involved ai. You should do tetris or even better a simple pong game. Basically, pick each of the skills(input, sound, 2D gfx) and use them all in a very simple game. I did this with my 2D game and I learned a lot in the process.

Actually, to be honest I would do a text game first. This will build your programming/design skills which you won''t have to sink time into when going thru 2D/3D stuff.

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quote:
Original post by JD
About half of the book I say. Plain vanilla C will do. It won''t be a pretty design but it''ll work for a small 2D game...


Have you ever saw a commercial game''s source code before? i recommend you looking into Homeworld source code. It really have a sweet design and it''s completly written in C.
Good designs have little to do with programming lenguages, it''s a matter of paradigm. You don''t have to know C++ just to write a game, but a Object oriented programming lenguage may help. I recommend you writting a 2d game first with SDL, it''s pretty straightfoward and powerfull.

Just one thing, do never stop learning.

P.D: sorry about my english (grammar, spelling, etc...etc...)

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All I said was that it won''t be a pretty design which I think majority of people would agree with me. I didn''t say that design only applies to OO langs like C++ or Java.

>> Good designs have little to do with programming lenguages, it''s a matter of paradigm. <<

This is false, btw. Why do you think Bjarne designed C++? If what you say is true then he could have continued to use C for good designs but he didn''t. He saw that a better design can be achieved with a new lang. C++ was designed primarily to achieve OO design which we learned from previous OO langs. Also, what do you mean "it''s a matter of paradigm"? What is the paradigm you speak of? If I gave you QBasic, could you write a million lines of code app in it and still achieve a good design? Think about this before you reply.

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quote:

>> Good designs have little to do with programming lenguages, it's a matter of paradigm. <<

This is false, btw



No, it isn't false. It's right on the money.

Not trying to flame, JD, but you *can* get a good design from C - OO or otherwise. The Homeworld source is a great example of that. C++ makes it easier to do so by supporting OO constructs natively. This has the benefit of simplifying the implementation of your design (you don't have to implement OO constructs yourself), and making the code easier to maintain in the long run. A well designed C program does not have to be a mess, but neither are designs implemented in C++ always well organized.

To the OP, IMO there's no yardstick to measure how much of any programming language you need to know to make a game. THere will always be things you learn along the way, provided that you do the research when you stumble into a tough problem. But there's more to it than just the language. There are high level concepts to learn (things you apply to the game logic) and low level concepts (processing input, rendering, blitting, etc...) - all of which are language independent. Set yourself some achievable goals and take it step-by-step. It will all come together eventually.

[edited by - aldacron on October 8, 2003 4:35:10 AM]

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quote:
Original post by asdasd12345
Hello. I am a total computer noob. I know a little Java, and I have bought Object Oriented Programming in C++ which I am in CH.4 (Structures). I am wondering how much information about function, structures, ect, I need to know before I can make simple games like Pac-man, Tetris, ect.


Try making one. If you have no idea how to begin, learn some more. As you learn, you''ll start to get an idea of how what you''re learning can be used. When you know how to go about writing these games, you know enough to write one. It''s really as simple as that.

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