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QzarBaron

Is tricks of the windows game programming gurus outdated

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k so im on my way to making a game i know c++ but now i need a book on game programming. my first thought was tricks of the windows game programming gurus. but i went to best buy and looked at it and found out it was very outdated. i use Visual C++.NET(2003) will it compile on that. if not what book can i use to learn. im soo lost. everything seems to be outdated. oh by the way i can only work on 2d(no know the math and programming to do 3d so far)

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OK!
yes you can use Tricks.
it''s not as outdated as you think.
actually it''s one of the most up to date 2D game programming out there.
also you CAN use Visual Studio. NET with the code in the book.
also if and when you buy that book, i suggest you also follow the Hands On Interactive Game Programming Forum. Yes it''s in GameDev Forum (just scroll down about half way).

and how do you figure that''s very outdated anyway?

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well ppl seem to say its outdated due to the fact it uses DirectDraw. I thought it was great but was sceptical. i want to buy a very good book. i guess ill give it a try any more suggestions.

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DirectDraw is technically out of date, but still works do to COM. Newer DirectX SDKs use differant methods to do 2d, but they AREN''T better methods. LaMothe''s book is a good way to get into game programming concepts, and is a good overall book for newbs. It reads like a novel.

That being said, I think SDL is MUCH easier to learn than WIN32/DirectX stuff, and if you get too frustrated with directX you may want to give it a try.

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DirectDraw is only out of date if you are looking at it form the perspective of a commercial game developer planning a AAA title. Otherwise, it is still very much relevant. The shareware, valueware, and freeware markets are full of new, current titles developed using DDraw. Check out some of the publishers of Indie games and you''ll see what I mean.

SDL is easier to learn because it wraps DDraw and other components of DX into a higher level library. That being said, DDraw is a snap with a good book, and Tricks is a good one IMO. I think it would be well worth your time and money to get it and put it to good use.

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If you''ve read the first Trick you could give the 3d Trick a shot

The 3d Trick uses also DirectDraw to acces the frame buffer so you can create a software engine
In the second part he uses a few functions from the first Trick so it could be useful if you''ve read the first one already.. I didn''t but maybe I will read it some time..

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IMVHO the best book for beginners is "Programming Linux Games" by Loki Software wich you can find for free surfing at www.google.com.

It teaches you the fundamentals of game programming and SDL and at the end of the book you''ll have built a simple but complete game.

Pluses are: Free book, that uses a free OS and a free compiler and a free IDE


Honestly it''s a very good book.

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quote:

SDL is easier to learn because it wraps DDraw and other components of DX into a higher level library. That being said, DDraw is a snap with a good book, and Tricks is a good one IMO. I think it would be well worth your time and money to get it and put it to good use.


Just for the record, I wasn''t knocking DX when I was suggesting SDL. I''m currently hooked on SDL because it''s cross-platform, and it has more instant gratification for a beginner(I fumbled a lot with DX and had a hard time motivating myself to learn it. Contrastingly, I had little difficulty getting a handle on SDL).

That being said, I intend to revisit DX after I have a couple SDL games under my belt, just like I intend to play with OpenGL. My point is that if you find yourself detered by the material, sometimes it is better to try a new perspective. All games programming theory is related, and Tricks is a good book regardless which api/wrapper/engine you decide to use as it covers a lot of good theory, which is even more valuable than the code itself.

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