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Erzengeldeslichtes

Intellisense died...

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I have a function which compiles fine, but as I go through it suddenly where I would get info about the function, lists of member functions and variables, etc, they simply don't appear. I have narrowed it down to this:
VECTOR* yMax, *yMin, *xMax, *xMin;
yMax = yMin = xMax = xMin = &Vertices[0];
for(int z=1; z<8; z++)
{
	if(Vertices[z].x > xMax->x)
	{
		xMax = &Vertices[z];
	}
	if(Vertices[z].x < xMin->x)//This line intellisense functions

	{//this line and beyond it doesn't.

		xMin = &Vertices[z];
	}
	if(Vertices[z].y > yMax->y)
	{
		yMax = &Vertices[z];
	}
	if(Vertices[z].y < yMin->y)//This line also functions properly if I remove the previous "last functioning line"

	{//Then beyond here it stops working.

		yMin = &Vertices[z];
	}
}
The line where it stops functioning is exactly the same as the functioning section as far as I can tell, there's no open functions (which kills intellisense but also kills compiles), and I simply can't understand what's going on. If I cut out the last functioning line, intellisense works for the rest of the file. If I put it back in anywhere it stops functioning from that point and beyond. What's so offending about that line? Edit: Just noticed that my other line with "<" in it also kills intellisense. Why? What's offending about the <? I'll try switching the variables and setting to >, but why does < kill intellisense? Edit2: HTML can be evil when it wants to be... [edited by - Erzengeldeslichtes on October 8, 2003 3:56:11 AM] [edited by - Erzengeldeslichtes on October 8, 2003 3:58:48 AM]

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I''ve noted some weird behaviors with Intellisense as well and I assume that for some mystic reasons your < are thought of as a opening include.

Some other things you can use to wreck IS:
in VS.net 2003, maybe even earlier:
void function(int _a, int _b)
will not be found, probably as somebody decided "only _TAG_names of c struct, followed by a typedef use underscores as first letter. Easy to work around, just loose the _

in VC++ 6.0 Std Intellisense wont offer members of classes whose headers are located somewhere else then the current working directory and therefore included by #include <header>.
I found a stupid warkaround for that a long time ago: highlight the header being included and select "open file" in the context menu. Funny enough he finds it, and opens it. Now make a change in the file, like insert a blank line at the beginning, and do NOT save. Voila now he known what you''re talking about and intellisense wizens up. Best thing is: Once the file was treated that way once this is apparently stored in the Project or Workspace so you have to pull that stunt only once per project.

---------------------------
I may be getting older, but I refuse to grow up

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When there are nothing else to do, you can comment away code that fucks is up and put it back into code when you have to compile it.

I had to do that once when is didn''t like my D3D includes

----------------------------------------------
Petter Nordlander

"There are only 10 kinds of people in the world. They who understand binary and those who do not"

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If youre using MSVC++ 6, I heard somewhere that if you delete the .pch (or pcb or whatever theyre called-- basically anything that is not a .h, .cpp, .dsp, or .proj file) files in your directory, then it should work again.

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