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eedok

looking for shortcut to sprites..

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I got a shortcut for my textures using the Buttonz and Tilez program, now I''m wondering if anyone knows of any shortcuts to making nice looking sprites.. of a human character 1 frame of standing still 16 movement frames(2 for each possible moving direction) and 16 attack frames(2 for each possible direction faced).. Is there any tips on how to easily start one of these off(for a person who has troubles properly drawing a stickman, even on paper). Maybe also some shortcuts to making the frames of animation easier(other than flipping the image horizontally to make right-left animations easier)?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Get a 3D model of some sort (Quake MD2, Half-life MDL, whatever) and take screen shots in different poses. Use Photoshop or The Gimp to crop/reduce to actual size.

If copyright ownership is an issue, I suggest you buy some models, such as the $59 starter paks available at www.geo-metricks.com.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Got terrible news for you: Good art (and even bad art) ALWAYS takes a lot of finicky work.

This isn''t the Atari 800 age any more...

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It has been said that creating sprites via 3D modelling->rendering is far easier to do for the non-artist than trying to draw them by hand, and I wholeheartedly agree. I have neglected my artistic skills since I was in high school, though recently I have begun to regain some of them. Creating character, monster, and item sprites and animations for my game has been significantly faster and easier using Blender than my past attempts at drawing them by hand, frame by frame. Not to mention, the results are far more satisfactory than my previous blurry masses of pixels.

The problem with drawing by hand--aside from the phenomenal amount of grunt work required--is that factors such as realistic shading, proportioning and perspective can only be achieved through due dedication in the pursuit of artistic skills. Such things are handled easily by default in 3D modelling due to the paradigm of modelling, and so the burdens of these responsibilities are removed from the artist (or, rather, technician, for modelling is more of a technical skill than an artistic one) and placed upon the modelling package. Any fool can model a sphere, and render it correctly shaded. It takes practice to do the same by hand.

Many professional studios use this method for creating the bulk of their assets, reserving traditional 2D artistic methods for concept sketches, story-boarding, touching up sprite renders, etc... Everything from animation sprites to interface components can be modelled, then rendered to your graphic file format of choice for inclusion into your game.

But, like the AP above said, it is going to take lots of work either way. It is just that the results may be more realistic with less artistic skill using the 3D approach.

Josh
vertexnormal AT linuxmail DOT org


Check out Golem: Lands of Shadow, an isometrically rendered hack-and-slash inspired equally by Nethack and Diablo.

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I always used Poser4/5 to make my character sprites. Just make the pane to the size you want, setup the lighting, animations, etc, then just render each frame to an image format. (You can set an option to save every frame) You can make the chest look like it''s breathing for the still animation and just use the walk designer for the movement animations.

It worked good for me, got a lot of cool characters...

-UltimaX-

"You wished for a white christmas... Now go shovel your wishes!"

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