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SonicSilcion

New ways of progression?

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There seems to be only a few ways of progressing in games. Here's my list: 1) "Amassing"~This is the prevailant method taken by Adventure games. Simply, to finish the game you get more stuff and use it. 2) "Rewards"~You do something, and you get something in return. In RPGs this is higher levels. In Adventures it's comes in the form of another 'key' or the opening of a passage. 3) "Returns"~You recieve an improvement in you character or your items for 'investing' a skill or item, respectively. RPGs implement this as a 'skill' or 'job' system where you only get better in an ability by working directly with it. 4) "Elimination"~Removing all obstacles is the way to win these games. For RTS games, this means laying waste to your enemies and their facilities. Similar are many board games. The objective of Chess is purely the removal of the other player's King. Even Tetris{tm} runs on this system -- get rid of the blocks. 5) "Racing"~Get to the end first. 'Kiddy Karts' anyone? And, added in from others' postings: 6) "Learning"~All functions of the game are available from the start of the game. The player is taught in game what these functions are as they progress. Thus, someone who has played the game before will know how to use these functions from the start of the game. The spells in "Castlevania: Symphony of the Night" were a good example of this; you can pull them off before you every find out about them in the game, but they are complex enough that you will not "stumble" upon them. It's an interesting technique when you consider replay value. --- Paraphrased from an Anonymous Poster So, is there anything we've missed? Any new ideas? -----Sonic Silicon----- Edited by - SonicSilcion on 7/7/00 9:11:27 AM
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You''re missing one.

LEARNING: The *player* has revealed to him/her functions of the game that were present from the start, improving her as a player and expanding the game. The spells in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night were a good example of this; you can pull them off before you every find out anout them in the game, but they are complex enough that you will not "stumble" upon them. It''s an interesting technique when you consider replay value.
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Relatively few games use this, but what about:

Dimplomacy/coalition: You build a coalition or reduce strife by convincing/haggling others into a common (often your own) position.

gollumgollum
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What about "Plot Chasing" - The players intrigue to find out who did something or why something occured. Information amassing/utilization?

I love Game Design and it loves me back.

Our Goal is "Fun"!
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Well you could make "learning" more complete by adding next to it "and training".
Learning is not enough.Practical training adds ability to your knowledge.

It is not enough to know what a spell does.You must be trained to it.

Voodoo4
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Nono, voodoo, I think you missed it. This has to do with PLAYER advancement, not CHARACTER advancement. Although some degree of training might be necessary for the player, it''s not often more than a minute or two. But since the only interface that has with the gameplay is the moment of revelation, there''s no technical reason to include it as part of the system. The computer can''t do anything about it.

I for one would love to see more single player games use this technique The only big problems arise in multiplayer.
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