Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Palin

Okay now that I know how to program...

Recommended Posts

I read an article where someone was getting angry about newbie''s wanting to make advanced games but not taking enough time to learn the advanced stuff themselves before even trying to make the game. Well I did and now I''m not here for the graphics or anything like that. I want to know all of the elements involved in making an RPG with detailed instructions as to maybe a generic way of making them. Does anyone know of a tutorial or something I could find on this? Like levels, percentages to increase points needed for level ups and other things like that. Can anyone help Please? Palin John 3:16 people John 3:16. And that is only the tip of the iceburg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe it''s just me, but every time I see a "How do you make an RPG" thread, I wonder if it''s better to write one yourself, and ask for specific help on topics you can''t make yourself.

How about you start something the way you think it should go, and if it fails, try again a different way. If you still can''t get it, post here again for help. This is the way I start developing games, and it''s the best way to learn some creative thinking in solving your own problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Asking "how to make an RPG" is very broad. Perhaps way too much. I suppose it would only be fair to answer in a broad sense, so as to give you an answer as close to what you''ve asked as possible...

1'' Plan on some stuff.
2'' Prepare ressources and code.
3'' Produce and ingest coffee.
4'' Implement ressources along with code.
5'' Test.
6'' Produce and ingest coffee.
7'' Debug.
8'' Re-test.
9'' Release.

There you go.

Perhaps a more in-depth explanation of what you want could help a little... Are you looking for help on writing the game engine? On planning content? Or on coming up with a basic storyline? There are many, many aspects to making an RPG and covering everything would be impossible. The basics, alone, are quite considerable...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why would anyone do all the hard stuff, then ask others to do the fun bit?

Honestly - game design is fun! You want to know about "The Official Way To Progress To The Next Level"? Don''t be so bizarre!

Come up with your RPG idea, and this kind of thing will flow naturally out of it.

Example: If the "Ultimate Player" in your game is one who has killed 1000 Mermaids, then maybe you level up with every 20 mermaids you kill. So if thats the case, then you design your levels such that there are weak mermaids available to low level characters and more feisty buggers in the further reaches of the game. And so on until 5am the following day when the last drink you have before going to bed is the morning coffee.

There are so many variables that if you make all the decisions yourself, you will have a unique game that you can take all the credit for.

Of course, if you aren''t making a game about mermicide, then I can''t help you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Palin
I read an article where someone was getting angry about newbie's wanting to make advanced games but not taking enough time to learn the advanced stuff themselves before even trying to make the game. Well I did and now I'm not here for the graphics or anything like that. I want to know all of the elements involved in making an RPG with detailed instructions as to maybe a generic way of making them. Does anyone know of a tutorial or something I could find on this? Like levels, percentages to increase points needed for level ups and other things like that. Can anyone help Please?

Palin

John 3:16 people John 3:16. And that is only the tip of the iceburg.

Did You ever play RPG games, i mean real RPG like AD&D, CyberPunk 2020 or WarHammer ??? if not go and buy one, play with friends. Then You will see what elemnts You need in RPG game


[Edited:] Real RPG <> Computer Games !


"The Gods Made Heavy Metal And They Saw That It Was Good They Said To Play It Louder Than Hell We Promised That We Would
When Losers Say Its Over With You Know That It’s A Lie The Gods Made Heavy Metal And It’s Never Gonna Die"

THE GODS MADE HEAVY METAL/by
ManOwaR

[edited by - Estor on October 24, 2003 9:08:19 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with the above poster who said game design is the fun part. If i could design my own game without having to program, I would be really happy.

Anyway, you could do like Baldur''s Gate and friends and adopt the official AD&D rules, but I think it would be much more fun to come up with your own system. (Plus i happen to think the AD&D rules are kinda stupid).

To answer one of your specific questions, usually doubling the experience points required to get to the next level is a good bet.

eg
to get to level 2: 10 pts
to get to level 3: 20 pts
to get to level 4: 40 pts
to get to level 5: 80 pts
to get to level 6: 160 pts
to get to level 7: 320 pts
...

When in doubt about what to put in a game design, I always believe that its good to model the ''real'' world when in doublt. For example, when deciding what kind of character stats to give your characters, The following are good:

Strength,
Speed/agility
Stamina

Whereas the following are bad:

luck - no such thing as a ''lucky'' or ''unlucky'' person
alignment/belief - Dont encode this into the character, let the player of your game act according to his own alignment
Intelligence - again, this should be handled by the player of your game and not the character inside the game.

This is all completely a matter of personal preference (mine). If you disagree or have any opinions about what ive said, then GOOD! If you dont have ideas of your own, it will be a long hard road making your game, no matter how much programming experience youve got!

Good luck (not that theres such thing )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just meant the variables. Maybe a few equations I mean I know about story lines and all of that. But like when I look at that RPGToolkit thing. It''s great if you don''t want to go through the whole code yourself but I do I just need to know the variables in general that most RPG''s on average use. I suppose though that it was too broad of a topic. I just can''t come up with many things on my own anymore. It''s been too long. Well thank you for your posts. Later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That''s entirely up to you. The general layout of abilities would be something along the lines of power, defense, magic power, magic defense and speed, though there''s no universal rule for this stuff. Just think of what you want to see in your game. I usually have the above, as well as accuracy, reflex (hit% and avoid% respectively) and luck (which affects misc. stuff, such as critical hits, ''surprised'' encounters, etc).

For stuff such as health and MP, I use a Basic Value + (Growth x Level) formula. For instance, 500 HP plus 100 per level, give or take 1/8th.

For EXP, the doubling method is good but gets out of hand rather quickly. I prefer using an exponential equation, like BaseEXP + BaseEXP ^ 1.1 every level (which does, assuming 100 exp at level 1, something like this...)

100
158
263
459
847
1663
3492...

It''s all about experimenting. If you have a graphic calculator, just try a few functions and graph them, see what it looks like. Experiment, tweak stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

For stuff such as health and MP, I use a Basic Value + (Growth x Level) formula. For instance, 500 HP plus 100 per level, give or take 1/8th.

For EXP, the doubling method is good but gets out of hand rather quickly. I prefer using an exponential equation, like BaseEXP + BaseEXP ^ 1.1 every level (which does, assuming 100 exp at level 1, something like this...)

100
158
263
459
847
1663
3492...




Thats what I agree with too! Do the designing yourself use RPGToolkit or Maker to try em out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

I just need to know the variables in general that most RPG''s on average use.



Try the following variables:

double temp;
int count;
string name;
int strength;
float time;

I bet these are good variables and most RPG''s on average use them.

Heres a bonus one:

char x;

I got more variables if you want, just let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don''t take this the wrong way, but...

Firstly, it''s nice to be a good coder. Knowing DirectX, OpenGL, Win32, SDL, pixel shader APIs etc etc etc is very useful.

But...

It takes more than a good coder to make a game. There''s also alot of imagination involved, as well as a willingness to research the knowledge you need.

I cannot believe you are the sole person on earth with NO IMAGINATION WHATSOEVER. And I also cannot believe anyone would seriously think they can come to a forum and ask for, simply, "everything".

If you''re bored with your project fair enough. But it sounds to me like you haven''t even started yet and you''ve given up. You''re going to need a little more stamina.

RM.

Incidentally......"iceberg".

------------------------------------------------------------
Yes. it''''s true, I DO wield the ugly stick. And I see I have beaten you with it before!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pick out the elements in some RPGs you like. Look at some open-source RPG projects. If you aren''t up to doing it all, joining a project is a great way to program it without worrying about art or design.

Scott Simontis
e-mail:ageofscott@comcast.net
AIM:ssimontis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LOL!!!! This is funny. Yeah I''m sorry. Actually I was hoping that there was some universal starting point for RPg''s and that others simply went away from it. I do have imagination it''s simply that my imagination and coding do not come together well. I did however come to this forum hoping someone knew of a website if the info not that it would be posted in a nice long post. Maybe though someone should come up with a generic univeral way of doing RPG''s it would help those of us who have a hard time expressing imagination in codeing. Maybe I''ll try that, if I can make my game. THank you all for your posts I don''t expect you''ll be back. I know I won''t. I''ll be too busy programming. Thanks again. later days.

John 3:16 people John 3:16. And that is only the tip of the iceburg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
there''s a program called RPGMaker that allows you to make rpgs without programming (or with some limited scripting)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
there''s a program called RPGMaker that allows you to make rpgs without programming (or with some limited scripting)

Let''s not doom people whom are new to programming to a fate as horrible as RPGMaker, shall we?

There''s no such thing as an universal starting point for any project, short of void main(void).

The best one could come up with is a general flowchart of things to do in an RPG. Of course, since there are so many ways to make an RPG, that''s pretty much impossible (compare, say, Final Fantasy 2 to Chrono Trigger...) Roughly, it would probably involve something like...

1'' Come up with an idea.
2'' Create the necessary media (sprites, models, music, sounds, code...)
3'' Implement the media.
4'' Enjoy.

That''s pretty much the most universal way to make an RPG there is. Other than that, you''d have to specialise a little. No two game engines are alike. No two battle engines run the same way. No two map engines display things the same way. It''s all about what you''re interested in coding. There''s no magical guide to making RPGs out there; we programmers have to do at least SOME work ourselves

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, if you''re looking for RPG ideas you can try reading "Sword & Circuitry". The problem with it is that it doesn''t give ideas to create RPG from scratch. (Which I think it shouldn''t, if not everyone will come up with same stuff......maybe)

If you want to come up with a whole new RPG system, try reading any available game system. You''ll probably find things that need improvement, try working on that. Alternatively you can try the "just make things up as you go along" way, but it''s not recommended.

If you face any problem, you can always post it here I''m sure you can find some help.

Wish you all the best......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Another article I recommend is "The Craft of Adventure". It will not tell you how to make an RPG but it can tell you what NOT to do. And it is a good read!

http://www.csd.uwo.ca/gradstudents/katchab/cs641-2002/articles/craft-of-adventure.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites