Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Lots of question

This topic is 5145 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Which is harder to learn - Java or C++? How much of Java/C++ do you have to know before you can get even an entry level software job someplace? Can you get a career in software without a CS degree? Does a Electrical Engineering degree offer more employment opportunities than straight CS if you learn to program in your spare time? Is software engineering becoming overcrowded because a lot of students are majoring in MIS/CS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Which is harder to learn - Java or C++?
Java is a bit easier.

How much of Java/C++ do you have to know before you can get even an entry level software job someplace?
Lots, if you don't have experince with programming, I suggest getting an associate's degree in CS from a community college. If you work hard, you can get one in a year.

Can you get a career in software without a CS degree?
Yes, they are much harder to come by, you'll watch people less skilled then you get paid better and move up the ladder of success much faster.

Does a Electrical Engineering degree offer more employment opportunities than straight CS if you learn to program in your spare time?
Probably. A whole BS in electrical engineering is a lot better than a hobbiest's ability to program.

Is software engineering becoming overcrowded because a lot of students are majoring in MIS/CS?
Software Engineering has little to do with MIS/CS. It is a branch on its own. Although it overlaps a bit with CS/MIS. It deals more with management & design issues of computer programming.

The only problem is, as the economy goes sour, the first thing that goes is QA, which is a big part of SE. So the job security is a bit less for a software engineer than a computer scientist.

Edit: Personally, if I was out of money, and I wanted a quick job programming computers, I'd tried to learn a less popular language, such as Fortran, COBOL, Ada, RPG, or lisp. Usually there are less requirements for those jobs, since there are less people willing to do them. (there are exceptions to every rule)
~~~~~
Adam & Eve "did not know right from wrong, therefore God could not punish them whenever they did all those things that really creeped him out." - Ghastly.
Download and play Slime King I.


[edited by - dede on November 9, 2003 2:32:13 PM]

[edited by - dede on November 9, 2003 2:33:04 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my university,first we learned c/assembler->z(formal)->c++ and only after java came. I disagree with starting with java. Start with c and assembler.This way you will learn in the very beginning how to do things manualy(not with ready tools like java''s).After that basic step, you can choose between c++/java/c# (I think one of them will do).

As for the electrical engineering or cs, I sugest you''ll do like me , software engineering 4 years BS degree. Software engineering combines CS and electrical engineering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The syntax of Java and C/C++ is extremely similar so switching between the two won''t be too hard but i would advise you to work your way up - perhaps start with C before tackling C++. After you have a good grounding in these then java should be a breeze to pick up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why make students learn C++ before Java? It''s like teaching integration then differentiation.

I personally much prefer C++ but students often struggle with pointers. If the industry is moving towards safer, pointerless languages, teaching C++ first doens''t make sense.

Wizza Wuzza?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What do you meen "pointerless". Are you a noob or something? Every REAL programmer must have a deep understanding of those things. Can you code things like compailer or device driver with "pointerless". I dont think so. So the first primer must is C and Assembly(x86).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, I think the more important issue is: "which one will be better for what I want to do?" because, although one may be easier, the language may not do what you want it to do. I''m currently trying to learn C++ an know no Java, so I''m not the person to ask on this. I just don''t want you to go spend x amount of time learning a language and then find it doesn''t do what you need it to do and discover you''ve just wasted all that time, because you''ll never use the language you learned. I learned HTML, but I don''t use it, so I don''t remember it. That means the time I spent on it went to waste. same with basic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First you need to know what sort of prgramming you want to do and focus on - for example are you only concerned with the Win32 platform or are you developing for linux as well?

If you know the answers to such questions then you will be able to choose a language which has the features you need, if cross-platform is an issue then Java is the way to go as all Java applications are portable by default due to the very nature of the language.

If portability is not such an issue then a language like C/C++ could be considered, these require a bit more thought if the end product is going to be portable due to the libraries that will be used etc but the advantage is the use of a more powerful language

It's impossible to say whether one is better than the other except through personal preference as each language was designed with a different objective in mind - Java to be multi-platform without the need to re-write code and C++ to addres some of the shortcomings of C while introducing OOP capabilities, my recomendation is to look at both, Java may be easier to learn but you can't ignore C++

[edited by - Spudder on November 10, 2003 6:08:01 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites