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Still have no IDE !

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Hi every-1. I lately posted something to complain cuz I had no IDE and to ask what I had to use to code with. Now that I''m almost able to do everything by myself using Gcc and Linux editors, I repeat what I first said : "I''M NOT A MERE LAZY BUM, BUT CODING THIS WAY IS REALLY PAIN IN THE ASS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!". Of course, Gcc is a good compiler and Linux stuff like Kate and KWrite don''t suck as hard as one could believe when they don''t know them, but still, not having the word completion and not being able to use all of GDB commands is as I said before "really pain in the ass" You always need to check the exact names of the functions and properties, no mistake is allowed and you gotta type everything by yourself. However, that can be funny sometimes (while writing small programs with no libraries to link and few makefiles lines to type), but I especially wanted to tell that I really had a reason to say an IDE is generally better than ''nothing''. Oh, BTW why do Kate and KWrite look so much the same?? Cheers. Prog, Hex & Rock''n''Roll : I don''t like the Prog but the Prog likes me. Some nice poetry to sweeten your spirit and relax a bit before programming

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Personally I have migrated away from using IDEs. My current preferences are to use Emacs and roll my own Makefiles, and compile in a shell. I find it forces me to be more dilligent with how I code. Its just a personal preference, and not a comment on IDEs in general. I think any given person should use the tools that best suit their working habits and personalities. To each his own.

There are several IDEs available for Linux, the most popular being KDevelop, Anjuta (sp?) and Borlands BuilderX. All of these are free (as in beer) and at least KDevelop is open source (not sure of the others - I have never used them).

I assume KWrite and Kate look a lot alike because they use the same libraries and probably written by people on the KDE design team. I never understood why KDE comes with so many different text editors, as well as KOffice, but choice is one of the benefits of the community

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I code using vim, and compile with make. Creating your own makefiles is easy (though the information on how to do so is pretty sub-par).

As far as looking up the names of functions, "grep -Ri functionname /usr/include/*" is pretty useful. There''s also an "agrep" that will find names similar to the one you give it, in addition to exact matches.

On windows, I always found the completion stuff inconsistent at best, and encourages the usage of the simpler features of C++ because it''s harder/impossible to get the more advanced things indexed.

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While tinkering with RedHat''s distribution, I noticed a development tool/IDE called KDev or something like that in the GUI... it looked like it was very similar to MSVC++ however, it kept crashing on me and I couldn''t get it to work correctly... but maybe that''s what you''re looking for. Granted it''s not neccesarily Unix, but maybe the compiler compiles into an executable format that any Unix system can run. It had the option for it, but I just couldn''t keep it from crashing.



I know only that which I know, but I do not know what I know.

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quote:
Original post by Daishi
While tinkering with RedHat's distribution, I noticed a development tool/IDE called KDev or something like that in the GUI

I believe it is called KDevelop(er?).

[edited by - kordova on November 13, 2003 12:19:16 PM]

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KWrite and Kate look the same because they''re essentially the same editor - thanks to KParts they''re using the same code for the actual text editing.

As for an IDE, I suggest you try the KDevelop 3 alpha releases. Yes, it''s an alpha, but it''s also the best Free IDE I''ve seen so far.

cu,
Prefect

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Hi. Thank you all for your advice, but I cannopt really get Flarelocke who says word completion is not a good thing. Though, I find it easier to find the list of fields and it also leads you throught the help files (when there are some).

Prog, Hex & Rock''n''Roll :
I don''t like the Prog but the Prog likes me.
Some nice poetry to sweeten your spirit and relax a bit before programming

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You can do word completion in emacs -- M-/ . It doesn't know anything about scope, member variables, etc., so instead it searches your current file, other open files, and the kill ring (I think) for words which have the word you're typing now as the prefix. It's definately different from how VC++ does code completion, and but seems to work pretty well, and as a bonus it works with any kind of source file.

You might also want to check out hippie-expand in the emacs docs, and rebind M-/ to hippie-expand. Hippie-expand is the bomb!

You might also want to check out M-x gdb, which starts gdb within emacs, so can then set breakpoints in the source buffer, sourc buffer will track the currently executing line, etc.

I think you can also get a tree class view, but I'm not sure how that works.

(edit: added bit about gdb-in-emacs)

[edited by - Garfong on November 14, 2003 9:06:31 AM]

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Word compleation != code compleation, of course.

I think slick edit has a *nix version, though it is a commervial ide it is pretty good.

IDEs can be nice, often just get in the way though, at least for somethings.


For comparison, I use a term window + (g)vim.

I currently lack (to my satisfaction) proper scoped code compleation which is an annoying loss and slows down coding a bit but is by no means fatal.

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