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Blender DLL

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I downloaded Blender for Windows 95 the other day, and when I started it up, it told me that it needed the DLL opengl32.dll So, I downloaded it, but now I have a problem: Where does Blender look for the DLL? I need to extract it from WinZip and put it in the place that Blender will be looking for it. Does anyone know where that is? Thanks neo88

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Guest Anonymous Poster
in the same folder that blender is. or in system (system32) folder.

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what display drivers have you installed?

the reason for not having an opengl32.dll is in 99% of all cases having you display drivers not/wrong installed or they don''t support opengl (in which case there should still be the windows software gl so it should work anyhow)

what i guess is your display drivers installation is quite messed up so try reinstalling them.

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Display drivers? I don''t know exactly what those are, I''ve never heard of the term before. Sorry it took so long to reply, but I was incovinicned for a few days.

neo88

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Display drivers are the software that comes with your graphics card (ar as part of your system drivers pre-installed, if your computer comes from Gateway, Dell, etc...) They are the interface by which Windows "talks" to the card, and accesses features such as hardware acceleration, etc... If opengl32.dll is missing, then yes you should re-install your drivers. Downloading some random dll from the internet is a good way to break something, or have something not work, or maybe expose your system to viral infection. I don''t recommend doing it this way.

If you know the manufacturer of your graphics card and the chipset it uses (Nvidia, ATI, whatever) you can get drivers from the chipset manufacturer or the card manufacturer to work with your particular card.

If your card is very old (the fact that you are running Win95 indicates it just might be very old), it is possible it is no longer supported by the manufacturer, and there may not BE any OpenGL driver available for it; in that case, any game or application utilizing OpenGL (Blender) will not be able to run. In that case, I recommend purchasing a new video card. (Any card old enough that OpenGL driver support is not available probably wouldn''t give you good performance anyway.)

Once downloaded, the drivers generally come with installation instructions or as an executable which will copy the required files to the correct locations. You should not have to manually do anything. Once the drivers are update and the system is re-booted, Blender should run.

Josh
vertexnormal AT linuxmail DOT org


Check out Golem: Lands of Shadow, an isometrically rendered hack-and-slash inspired equally by Nethack and Diablo.

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My card is a Matrox Mystique. It''s fairly old because Linux can''t even read ouput from it. What kind of card would you suggest that I get ( I have 20 gig hard drive ) I have 500 mb of RAM also. The new ATI Radeon Pro looks cool, but I don''t know if my hardware can support it.

neo88

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Really, the only limiting factor in the card you choose is your motherboard configuration. There are 2 main configurations for PC video card interface right now: AGP and PCI. Occasionally, you can find a particular graphics card model in either flavor, though AGP cards (AGP being a newer slot configuration than PCI) are far more prevalent, and PCI cards are rapidly disappearing. Take a look at the following picture for a quick rundown of identifying.

(Warning: cheap and stupid visual aid follows.)



Circled in blue is an example of a PCI slot. Circled in red is an AGP port (typically, a motherboard will only have one); if you have a slot that looks like that on your motherboard, purchase an AGP card. If not (if all your slots look like the rest of the slots in the above pic, or if some are even bulkier and uglier (ISA), but none look like the AGP slot above) then you will have to purchase a PCI version if you can.

Incidentally, the Matrox website lists various drivers, including drivers for your Mystique. Here are some Windows WHQL certified drivers (you will find Mystique in the list).

As far as driver support for Linux-- heh heh, this historically has always been iffy at best (getting better), so I wouldn''t be too quick to use it as a gauge for hardware quality. However, if you are going to use Linux extensively, it is of course necessary to have working hardware, so if you can not find good working Linux drivers, perhaps you should go ahead and purchase a new card. Again, incidentally, the Matrox website lists the latest drivers; it looks like Mystique G200 Linux drivers are in beta, and none are planned for the vanilla Mystique. So maybe, it wouldn''t be such a bad idea to get a new card after all.

I recently installed an ATI Radeon 9600 in my sister''s computer, and it seems to work acceptably for everything she requires (I haven''t benchmarked it). My own tastes are currently leaning away from NVidia and toward ATI.


Josh
vertexnormal AT linuxmail DOT org


Check out Golem: Lands of Shadow, an isometrically rendered hack-and-slash inspired equally by Nethack and Diablo.

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My motherboard isn''t the easist thing in the world to access, so I''ll have to do that later. I didn''t know that Matrox still supported the Mystique, but I guess you learn something new every day. It''s to bad that Linux device drivers aren''t up to speed with graphics cards, because that is probably the only thing holding my back from going Linux all the way. I have Mandrake 9.0 vs. Windows 95 on the other side of the partition. Are all newer graphics cards really expensive? It doesn''t look like the Mystique is all that bad, but my budget is really low at the momment. Who''s isn''t?

neo88

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Also note that even if you do have an AGP slot, it has to supply the graphics card with the correct voltage, and boards that support different voltages (specified by the AGP standard) will have different slot shapes. If your motherboard supports AGP 4X, any AGP card will work in it, but if it only supports AGP 1X or 2X, anything up to AGP 4X cards (up to Radeon 9000 [I think] or GeForce4 Ti 4600 [not 4800!]) should work, although older motherboards tend to blow up because they can''t handle the current drawn from them.
Judging by your graphics card, you probably have quite an old system, so you may want to take your CPU into account as well. There''s no point in getting a high-end graphics card if the CPU can''t feed it fast enough.
Note that this isn''t a hardware forum, you''ll get more comprehensive replies in an appropriate forum.

- JQ

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Would it be worth it just to get a new motherboard? Or should I just get a new CPU, because of the cost in getting a motherboard? I will admit my system is due for a change.

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I''d just like to point out that the first versions of Windows 95 did not include Opengl32.dll and, as far as I know, the card drivers do not install one. The opengl32.dll needs to be loaded by the program, then it passes control off to the card. So he did, indeed, need to download the dll.

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Aldacron: That''s good news, but what do I do with it now? I have it in a winzip file: Should I extract it and put somewhere? Where? Thanks.

My Kung Fu is stronger.
neo88

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Guest Anonymous Poster
you need to unzip it, and copy the dll to the c:\windows\system\ folder or the c:\windows\system32 folder. Either will work. After that reboot.

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It worked!!!! Now I have a new problem: error message I recieved:

glu32.dll was not found

Should I do the same thing with this new file ( I''ll download it ) and put it in the same directory? Thanks.

My Kung Fu is stronger.
neo88

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