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which IDE do you use ?

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hi; which IDE do you linux dev''s use ? i''m asking myself if there is a good IDE which is as perfect as MSVC6 + VA ?? some opinions ??
DJSnow --- this post is manually created and therefore legally valid without a signature

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A lot of unix developers tend to use text editors

Personally I tend to use Nedit... It''s mostly just a text editor, but does syntax highlighting for just about every language you can think of, plus a couple of other nice features.

For an IDE though, KDevelop seems to be popular (I haven''t tried it, but I get the feeling it may be geared mostly towards developing KDE apps). Anjuta is also quite popular and from the little bit I have used it it seems quite nice.



Drakonite

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I haven't personally tried this IDE yet, but my university has it installed in both the Unix and Windows labs. It's called jGRASP. It can be used on Unix/Linux, Windows, Mac OS, and some others. It can handle Java, C, C++, Ada 95, and others. You just have set it up to use different compilers. The FAQ says, "jGRASP is set up by default to run a Java SDK compiler for Java, a gnu-style compiler for C and C++"

You can download it free from the creators at Auburn University at:
http://www.eng.auburn.edu/department/cse/research/grasp/index.html

It appears from the credits that this IDE was written by some Ph.D professors at Auburn University. (Probably helped by some grad students as well.)


[edited by - Feydrex on November 13, 2003 12:29:50 AM]

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@all:
i don''t want do be impolite, bus as said above i''m looking forward to not to increase the work comfort i have with MSVC6 + VA !?

@stefu:
in consideration of the fact that not alle borland builder products are using the same technology, i''m not sure if it is as good as JBuilder.


Has anyone tried that metrowerks thingy on linux ??





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I use Anjuta.

I''ve never understood how people can say they''re more productive using a simple text editor and a console. How can you get more productive and efficient than when you click on a class name in a window and go to the declaration, then click on a function and then go right to the definition of the function? Maybe I''m doing something wrong, but I don''t get it.

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Hope this isn''t too off-topic...

how do the xterm guys generate all the config/make files? Is there a tool to generate that in an easy way? One of the things i like most in the IDEs is that they generate all that stuff for me.

Victor.

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quote:
Original post by -vic-
Hope this isn't too off-topic...

how do the xterm guys generate all the config/make files? Is there a tool to generate that in an easy way? One of the things i like most in the IDEs is that they generate all that stuff for me.

Victor.


autoconf and automake (and libtool,aclocal,autoheader), basicly you create a configure.in in your top source directory, a Makefile.am in every directory of your project and then you use the above tools to generate makefiles and a configure script. Google around for some tutorials, or go look in the configure.in and Makefile.am ('s) generated by your IDE.



[edited by - George2 on November 18, 2003 3:57:50 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Strife
This question really needs to be added to the FAQ. Hint hint... Nudge nudge...

I suppose so. I''ll write something up later.

quote:
Original post by BradDaBug
I''ve never understood how people can say they''re more productive using a simple text editor and a console. How can you get more productive and efficient than when you click on a class name in a window and go to the declaration, then click on a function and then go right to the definition of the function? Maybe I''m doing something wrong, but I don''t get it.

Maybe we don''t sit there clicking on class and function names all the time . Even if I am using an overly-helpful editor like Anjuta, I still need to have a terminal around because I''m so used to using it anymore; I can write a call to grep or man faster than I can click around in a GUI, and I''m very accustomed to writing make -C meh to rebuild just one sub-directory, et cetera. Besides, with any decent editor you can find something your forgot where you put quickly some other way without a list cluttering up your screen .

If anyone cares: I''m back to using VIM (and its GTK+ variant) for editing. I''m also writing plug-ins for Gedit to make it have some of VIM''s features (an incomplete VIM-style keyword completion plug-in is already done here).

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@BradDaBug:

>>on a class name in a window and go to the declaration,
obviously you have never worked with "Visual Assist" from wholetomato.com !
i don''t need the mouse to code - but it matters for me if i have to type the full word X3DWin32Interface or if i have to type a "X" and then press return, because the automatic source enhancement has recognized that i mean this word.


and sorry, i make a bug in my previous post:

>>to not to increase the work comfort i have with MSVC6 + VA !?
this should red DECREASE and not increase, as you can guess.




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*token emacs person putting in a vote for emacs*

As far as autocomplete works, M-/ in emacs also does autocomplete... it works a little differently than VC++, however it works with every programming language. Also check out hippie-expand in emacs.

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I think that no matter which IDE you try, you''ll have to change and get used to it. The real question is do you want to do as little of this as possible, or do you want to try other IDEs, as you need to change anyway.

My advise is to try Anjuta or Eclipse if you want an IDE like VC++, and try vi(m)/(x)emacs for something different.

Personally I use xemacs and an Eterm or two.

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stop:
yes, of course: i''m willing to change, and i''m willing to learn (if i wouldn''t, i wouldn''t ask for IDE''s on linux/unix)
BUT:
i''m only willing to change the IDE if i have at least a minimum of comfort. writing code in a texteditor is not that thing that i prefer. and, as told above, i''m coming from windoze environment, and VA provides a _very_ high comfort for typing code (MSVC codeenhancement is shitty, too - therefore this plugin/addon to solve the homemade-MS-bugs).
It seems that all people here are claiming which and what to use, but noone has ever tried VA, obviously - because then you wouldn''t bring things like "...use emacs..." or "...use eclipse..." - i know emacs, and its nothing else than a better DOS-edit.com, but it''s no gooduseable IDE ! and i know eclipse, too - but, the plugins for C++ code and the codeenhancement are not very well written: i have tried eclipse on my windows machine - and i also tried the codeenhancement plugin for it, and it''s as shitty/buggy as the standard-build-in-enhancementtool, which comes with MSVC6.

I don''t want to be rude, but i can''t believe that all developers on linux/unix machines on this world, even the ones who are writing big (killer!) applications, are using stoneaged-tools like texteditors, emacs and such shitty products ?????!?!?!?!?!?!
Come on - there must be at least one highlevel IDE outthere ???

Comparison: JBuilder on linux - does anyone know this IDE ? Or perhaps the windoze version ? (enterprise editions are nearly exact the same)




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quote:
Original post by DJSnow
It seems that all people here are claiming which and what to use, but noone has ever tried VA, obviously - because then you wouldn''t bring things like "...use emacs..." or "...use eclipse..." - i know emacs, and its nothing else than a better DOS-edit.com, but it''s no gooduseable IDE !



So you know emacs eh? Ok, a few quick questions then, shouldn''t be too hard for you to figure out (I''m not really an emacs guru either).

1) How do you set a breakpoint on a sourcecode line when using emacs gdb mode from the sourcecode buffer (not the gdb buffer)?

2) What''s a tags file used for, and how do you create one?

3) How do you rebind the home and end keys to go to the beginning and end of the buffer, respectively?

4) How does the standard M-/ code completion work in emacs?

5) Which of the following can emacs _NOT_ do (pick all that apply):
a) Edit text
b) Read and write email
c) Compile programs (by hooking in with an external compiler)
d) Debug programs (by hooking in with an external debugger)
e) Interface with CVS and RCS.
f) Play tetris

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I personally use KDevelop for real projects and Kate for anything small or utility/library style.
I''ve heard you can use the editor of kvim (the KDE version/frontend to vim) in KDevelop, I''m going to give that a shoot soon.

DJSnow: just try them all out for a week and stick with the one you like most. Since you''re used to MSVC you''ll probably appreciate KDevelop, as the user interface is scarily similar.

- JQ

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quote:
Original post by Garfong
5) Which of the following can emacs _NOT_ do (pick all that apply):
a) Edit text
b) Read and write email
c) Compile programs (by hooking in with an external compiler)
d) Debug programs (by hooking in with an external debugger)
e) Interface with CVS and RCS.
f) Play tetris
(a), of course .

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Hello,

Anjuta has code autocompletion... I saw it on their features list. Granted I have never tried Anjuta, in fact before this post I have never heard of it.

As far as finding an IDE that has similiar functionality as something like visual assist (which is really helpful, I might add), I would say go with JohnnyQuest''s advice: try them all out for a week or so and see which one fits you best.

The only IDE I have tried out on Linux was KDevelop. It has been a while since I have used it, and it was before I really knew how to program.

I hope you find an IDE of your choice, and when you do, I would like to hear your opinion on which one you like.
-Boblin

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quote:
Original post by ze_jackal
quote:
Original post by Garfong
5) Which of the following can emacs _NOT_ do (pick all that apply):
a) Edit text
b) Read and write email
c) Compile programs (by hooking in with an external compiler)
d) Debug programs (by hooking in with an external debugger)
e) Interface with CVS and RCS.
f) Play tetris
(a), of course .




*heh* Reminds me of a .sig I saw somewhere.

"emacs and sendmail are both great operating systems. All they''re missing is a decent editor and a MTA"

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by DJSnow
i know emacs, and its nothing else than a better DOS-edit.com,

I don''t want to be rude, but i can''t believe that all developers on linux/unix machines on this world, even the ones who are writing big (killer!) applications, are using stoneaged-tools like texteditors, emacs and such shitty products ?????!?!?!?!?!?!


You know something, I dont think you do know emacs if you are really saying its just a text editor.

You can''t blame the people in this thread, you should have been honest in your original post and said "I want a gui to click on while making programs" since this seems to be your main criteria.

I am just learning (X)Emacs and am amazed by some of the features I found (thanks to the poster in this thread who mentioned M-/ by the way, thats excellent!)

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The best editor I have used is Visual SlickEdit. ( http://www.slickedit.com ) It has emulation for emacs, vi, and a few others. While typing a call to a function, not only does it display the parameters, it also displays the comments attached to the function. There is no need to travel to another file to look at it. It is not free, but if you have MSVC, this is probably not an issue for you.

Emacs and VI/M would not be as popular as they are now if they were useless. These are not Notepad clones. For sure they have not the broadness of commercial applications, but for editing source code, which is a core component of programming, they certainly have no equals. I have heard VIM is the best, so I suggest downloading the SlickEdit trial and enabling VI emulation.

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