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Chuck3d

Game job and software programming

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I know I must work on game demos if I want to work in the games industry, but actually I 'm coding a software 3D engine like quake. Is it a good things professionaly ? !o) [edited by - Chuck3d on November 14, 2003 7:00:03 AM]

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I guess it depends how far along your demo is. Most people you show it to will understand its a big project and understand the effort put into it but in the early stages you won''t have much to show except maybe a few triangles or a simple model being rendered.

I''m working on my own engine at the moment (using DirectX) and i''m wishing i had started another game instead, since i had to start looking for a new job recently and i was only a couple of months into the engine. The ammount of code involved is huge and some of it very complex but it still doesn''t look impressive and i think initial visual impact can count for quite a bit.

If you don''t need a demo soon then go for it, but spending a week or 2 on a simple demo first might give you a nice fall back plan.

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ok, visual effect count a lot. But are the games companies interresting by knowledge in Algorithmic ? I think it is more important thant knowledge in graphics libraries.

Other points of view ?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Sad as it is, you might not have the time to explain all the hard work you put into your engine.

These people like people that can present finished products!

It''s not just your demo the''re looking at, it''s your time management skills e.g. having a finished demo is more valuable than having a completely incomplete demo and a good engine.

All they may have time to look at is your demo, so only make a fabulously complex engine if your demo requires it.
(or you just want to show off and have the time)

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From my experience people want your demo to either look cool, do something neat, be addictive or demonstrate that a lot of time and effort has gone into it. The more polished something is the better, though for large projects this doesn''t have to mean complete, just that having crash bugs, big memory leaks or no checking for hardware caps (not a problem for you) won''t be looked on too kindly.

The problem with a spinning cube etc is that the interviewers know that you could easily, and probably have, borrowed code or inspiration from GameDev and google. Even worse some of them may have written a similar engine and think/know that they could do the same thing if they had a day free, albeit probably using a stack of helper libraries and code bases they''ve built up over the years.

So until you can expand the engine to be more complete it might not count for much. As soon as you can render a small level with textured objects, light maps and dynamic lighting you''ll be on to a winner.

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I''m student and I go in the active life soon, im a little nervous. You think that its not lost time to work on a quake like game to have a job (if it is good work naturaly)? I''m french and i want to know too if the USA company employed foreigner ?

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Well, foreigners, maybe, but French, I don''t know

Seriously, It is as much the technical excellence as the quality of the code that are important for beginners. If both are top class, hell yeah.

A good software renderer a-la quake means you know maths, matrices, vectors, maybe quaternions, cameras, lighting and shadows (lightmaps possibly?), dithering and filtering, rastering and clipping, some partitioning principles (BSP or other trees), skinning and animation, collision detection maybe, and if you can throw in a few path finding monsters, then you are on a winner, unless it looks like it''s been coded by a cross between a pig and a chimp. You got to know your C++. Note that the biggest market in the video games industry is the PS2, so knowing the underlying principles of a renderer like the back of your hand is an advantage, like say, over a kiddie who''s just being copying OpenGL tutorials.

But doing a demo like that would probably take the best of a full year, non stop. No weekends, no holidays, which means, you are already prepared for the horror of a life in the game industry So, bonus for them.

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quote:
Original post by Chuck3d
ok, visual effect count a lot. But are the games companies interresting by knowledge in Algorithmic ?


ironically, the demand for knowledge in Algorithmic has declined recently. probably because nobody in the industry knows what the fuck Algorithmic is.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Why do you think you need a demo to get a job as a game programmer? Most people (in my experience) get hired without having a demo.

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Anonymous Poster:
I need a game demo because i'm bad in english

Oliii:
In fact, I have not a years ... but six month ! Thousand hours !
I must realize a project for the hight scool, and I've proposed my game engine, its a very exciting adventure ! I'm happy of what you say, because It's a very hard work, very long and very stressfull, but it may pay one day. I know I work not for nothing now. It is just what I wanted to know.

simbiant: Oh! It's why the 3D engine are so bad nowday !

BarnyardMessiah:
My engine is written from nothing. I just read the M.Abrash Black Book. I hate read code, I think the code is secondary, then I have the winquake one, but i never read it or just to say "Amazing, this !??+/§ really give a good result"


Thank you all



[edited by - Chuck3d on November 15, 2003 7:09:34 AM]

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BarnyardMessiah: Yep, a mod of an engine would work well as a demo, of course it depends what you''ve modified. Since you have a complete engine to work with it also means you can make your demo look (and play?) pretty damm nice.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you want a job at an English-speaking game company, you have to be able to communicate effectively in English. No demo, no matter how good, will change that.

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quote:
Original post by Chuck3d
BarnyardMessiah:
I read somewhere that is a very good things to do mods because lots of company work with great engine, and search people who know this engine.


The vast majority of games companies DO NOT use the commonly modded engines.


However being able to create a _good_ mod shows that you:

- can design playable levels/know good gameplay.

- can use proprietary level editor tools.

- can design levels with constraints such as frame rate and texture memory in mind.

- have reasonable general knowledge of how a game is constructed.

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Anonymous Poster: yes you're right, but ... it's an other problem ! My topic is about computing... and my question was: in general, are the english companies interresting by foreigner.

[edited by - Chuck3d on November 15, 2003 4:07:41 PM]

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I worked on the actual engine itself, adding bump mapping using vertex/fragment shaders, hitboxes to the players, added control over the blended animations(for hand to hand combat), dynamic decal effects (blood pooling up, and smearing down walls), particl fire to players, and some added ridgid body dynamics to the vehicles to name a few.

I feel it shows that I can function in some vital areas in game development, collision, graphics, and physics.

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my own engine doesn''t implement the ''top of the line graphics'' (i.e. it uses static lightmaps for shadows instead of dynamic shadows using the stencil buffer) but it sets itself apart from the majority of other engines because of the fact that I''m programming interactivity, i.e custom entities that you can actually interact with. As someone said earlier if it does something cool, people will like it.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Barney, that sounds really cool, shadow that sounds good as well.
Making something better than it was or doing something interesting (good), is important, games companies basicly want people who can make their life easier, that''s not about the language thing though, you can soon learn better English as you go. A game company wants to be able to dump a whole lot of work on you and know you can do it, or they want to make their engine better and think that you can help.

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