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requiem14

Mobile apps in C/C++

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I very new to the mobile side of things and just need a little bit of information. Firstly, I realise Java is probably more suited to mobile programming but as I''m fairly scratchy on my java, I would prefer to code in c or c++. Is there anyone that is currently doing this that can point me in the direction of any tutorials, and also advise me on general start up issues. I''ve gathered that I''ll have to program for Symbian OS and use its SDK. Also should I rethink the C over java issue? Is it that big a deal on mobiles? Thanks

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You could try Mophun - it''s a great c/c++ system for mobiles, they also now have a 3D version. It runs on lots of different phones and Pocket PC''s. Visit www.mophun.com

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Hi!

Mophun runs on pocket pc''s ? As i know it only runs on sony phones. They say that it runs also on symbian s60 devices, but i cannot find an engine to able to make mophun games for symbian s60. I cannot find informations about pocket pc''s at mophun.com.
It would be nice to have a 3d engine that runs on all these devices...

McMc

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quote:


quote:

As i know it only runs on sony phones. They say that it runs also on symbian s60 devices, but i cannot find an engine to able to make mophun games for symbian s60.
quote:


It does look like a very professional engine/setup. Its a pity it doesn't support a wider range of mobile phones.

Thanks for the help people.


These are the phones Mophun works on:

Mophun Phones

Anthony




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[edited by - hammon on November 18, 2003 7:26:57 AM]

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I come from a desktop c++ background, and is currently working on j2me mobile games and applications for my current company. I have been looking into symbian c++ and i must say, I had a pretty hellish time working with it. To get it to work, I had to throw away most prior standard c++ knowledge, for example, Resource initialization is acqusition. Normally this is done in a constructor, where you acquire all you need for a class, and release them in a destructor. Because of the lack of exceptions in symbian, there is no way for you to report an error if it fails to acquire the resource. Of course, there is the so called Leave method which they claim to be performance better than exceptions and is better to use, a Leave called in a constructor do not release the memory used by the object(assuming it''s allocated on the heap). In fact, a leave do not unwind the stack. It only performs cleanup on items that have been pushed to a symbian class, Cleanup stack. That does not work well with a lot of STL codes and stuff, resulting in pretty high unportable codes. In fact, if you have an existing library and wants it to work with symbian, unless it do not rely on destructor and exceptions, chances are it wont work.
I''m not going to touch that ugly piece of so called c++ on symbian until I really need to. I never believe the day would come when i actually choose java over c++.

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...and then there''s the build process and the emulator, if all that isn''t bad enough. It uses perl scripts to build crazy project data which eventually runs GCC (adding new source files to your projects isn''t a simple procedure at all). And the emulator runs Win32 code (compiled using a Win32 backend on the GCC compiler), not emulated Arm code, so it doesn''t really emulate the device at all (in fact, the emulator behaves significantly different to the actual device).

It all just seems to be badly thought out in my opinion (as in, more complex/convoluted than it really needs to be).

Skizz

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I work at a mobile games developing company. Our games fall in two categories: J2ME and C++ using BREW. I believe BREW is pretty widespread, there are at least 30 BREW phone models that we are currently targeting (and a lot more that we are no longer actively targeting). The BREW environment also has a lot of shortcomings and annoyances that you have to get used to, a lot of them pretty similar to the things dot describes. This is just a result of working with such limited devices.

The question of what language to use really boils down to what phones you want to target.

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quote:
Original post by pinacolada
I work at a mobile games developing company. Our games fall in two categories: J2ME and C++ using BREW. I believe BREW is pretty widespread, there are at least 30 BREW phone models that we are currently targeting (and a lot more that we are no longer actively targeting). The BREW environment also has a lot of shortcomings and annoyances that you have to get used to, a lot of them pretty similar to the things dot describes. This is just a result of working with such limited devices.

The question of what language to use really boils down to what phones you want to target.

I really wanted to try out BREW, except I''m located in Asia and CDMA phones(what BREW currently is being supported, but if you can prove me wrong, all the better isn''t that widespread around here.
OOh did I ever mention Symbian UIQ 2.0 and 2.1 beta requires CodeWarrior IDE to compile? And even the personal edition is 15 days trial. Couldn''t do much after 15 days, and within such a short frame of time I can''t even justify myself to purchase Codewarrior IDE. I heard that Borland C++ Builder Mobile edition can be used to compile 2.1, but I haven''t looked into the cost and if it can work on 2.0

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Hi!

One disadvantage of brew is the fact that you have to certify your applications to be able to sell them. One test run costs 400-800 US$, if the test fails you can look for the error and pay another 400-800 US$.
If you are a company you are able to pay this money, but if you are programming games as a hobby and want to bring your game to the public (and perhaps earn some money), these up front costs are not worth doing it.

McMc

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I visited www.mophun.com.I quite don''t understand that if I just want to use mophun environment and their libary to develope my game, I have to send my game development spec. to the mophun staff first to verify whether my game spec suit for their requirement
then they will allow me to download thier product to implement,Right?

if I just a student ,Can I registered and download their software only for test and learn purpose?

I think I''m not clear with their condition.I do read twise but I still don''t understand.

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