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Hi there, I''m starting a new programming project soon (non-game related) and I have a couple of questions. I have a small home network with 2 PC''s connected to an external ADSL connection through a router. I also have a website hosted by ipowerweb.com. I either want to use the website or one of my PC''s on my home network to host the code for the project, possibly with a code versioning system like CVS or Subversion running. I would like a couple of friends of mine to be able to access the code, make changes etc. and I can do this one of two ways: 1) Somehow make my network available to them so that they can log on to my PC using ...(I dont know.. Putty, something else?). 2) I can create a secure section to my website, put the code there, and allow them to log on, make changes etc. A few things to take into account are the fact that my friends dont have Linux installed, though I could possibly persuade them to do so. I know that there is some way to access Linux programs remotely from windows machines using something called Xwin32 (?). If they log on to my PC remotely then they will need to do so using something like SSH, as Telnet isnt that secure- is this correct? Although the idea of having them access the code on my PC directly whilst Im at work is tempting, I''m unsure of the security risk that would involve- is it worth it? Am I better off just making a part of my website secure and handling all the code versioning manually (ipowerweb doesnt let you install things like CVS as far as I know). Jon

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Actually, Open Source Project is a bit of a misnomer. We havent decided on whether the code will be open source yet or not. It depends...

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If you use CVS, all your friends need is a CVS client. TortoiseCVS is a fantastic Win32 (only, unfortunately) one. You need to run the CVS server, and setup your router to allow access on the relevant ports.

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quote:
Original post by jonpolly99
handling all the code versioning manually


/me shudders. A source control system is a necessity if there are more than one person working on a set of source files - it''s not a luxury.

Installing a Subversion server isn''t that hard: http://svn.collab.net/repos/svn/trunk/INSTALL. Also see subversion.tigris.org

For clients, go with TortoiseSVN: tortoisesvn.tigris.org

If you go with this option(or CVS - blech), you don''t have to do 1 or 2. All your friends need to access is the source code repository.

--
AnkhSVN - A Visual Studio .NET Addin for the Subversion version control system.
[Project site] [Blog] [RSS] [Browse the source] [IRC channel]

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OK. So if I have this right heres how it works...

My friends install something like TortoiseSVN as a client on their Windows machines- I install Subversion as a server on Linux on my PC, and I configure my router to allow access to my PC for the associated port number.
My friends can then access my Linux machine, obtain the source using subversion and integrate it back into the main code using Subversion when they are done making changes.

This right?
Jon

ps. I was having a Xwindows clients but Xwin32 is about 200 quid and the others I''ve seen look a bit pants...

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