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Mass of real-world materials ?

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Hi guys, How can I determine the mass of objects made up of real materials ? For example, a sphere of solid gold with a radius of 1.0 units (inches, centimeters, etc) ? Do I use the sphere''s volume and the atomic weight of gold ? I really have no clue. It''s just for fun and doesn''t have to be exact. Thanks.

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What you want is volume times density, with density being a measure of mass per cubic meter. No doubt there''s a listing of the approximate densities of various materials floating around on the ''net. If you have a set of scales floating around at home you could probably work it out yourself for the really common materials.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I''m not sure how helpful that webelements site is for this purpose. It only lists elements, and I didn''t see any data about density.

After a quick search, I found this site with a long listing of densities of various materials: http://www.gkehe.8m.com/data.htm

Multiply the density by the volume, and you know the mass. You should be able to find lists of formulae for the volumes of simple geometric solids.

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you can get densities easily by googling Mendeleiev, because most people include densities (at standard temperature&pressure and structure).
Count 3000Kg/m^2 for concrete or stone
1000 for water
7000 for steel
20000 or so for gold
...

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