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java3D or GL4J

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Hi i m new in this field .. and wanted to know if java3D is better than gl4j to start with OpenGL on java platform .. and also want to know if anyone has java ports for tutorials on nehe.gamedev.net .. i got the java ports on GL4J ( it would not be a problem if you suggest me to go on to start with GL4J ) but if you people prefer Java3D then where can i get ports for tutorial on nehe.gamedev.net or any other place which has good openGL tut on Java3D ...

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In my opinion GL4Java is much "better/easier" than Java3D. Basically GL4Java is almost exactly like GL with c/c++ so it''s a lot easier to understand NeHe''s tutorials + if you ever switch to c/c++ you already know the OGL way of doing stuff. Java3D is built on scene managers etc which makes it a bit harder to begin with imo (might be because of the lack of tutorials).

So I''d say stick with GL4Java and NeHe''s tutorials.

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I''ve worked with both Java3D and gl4j. From my experience, gl4j is *slow*. Perhaps it was simply the computer I was working on, but I was toting a wopping 1-2 FPS on even the simplest programs.

That being said, gl4j looks a lot more like OpenGL than Java3D. In fact, Java3D is not like OpenGL at all. Java3D likes to deal with more of a high-level approach with its scene manager. If you''re looking for something that looks and feels like OpenGL, gl4j is the way to go.

Hope that helps,
--Brian

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quote:
Original post by 2Fast
Hi i m new in this field ..
and wanted to know if java3D is better than gl4j
to start with OpenGL on java platform ..

J3D is *not* OpenGL. Its a high level scene graph API that just happens to use OpenGL (or DX) for its actual rendering.

GL4Java is an OpenGL wrapper, but its an old one now and not a good choice. Better ideas would be LWJGL or JoGL (google them).

Plenty of more detailed discussion on both these in the Java forum.

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well i have done c , c++ and vc++ ( not mfc ) but of all i feel comfortable with Java
so i wanted to know if there are more such wrapper available for OpenGL in Java
but as peeps here said that gl4J is dead and J3D is going to be dead ...
Even i have read that J3D is going to be replaced with something new ( i read it on Java site java.net or some other i dont remember .. but news source was definately reliable ..)
so then what should i go ahead with ...
i mean there will definately going to be a WINNER among all of them ...

JoGL and LWJGL whatelse...

are there any tutorial, examples ( i mean cool ones for starters .. ) on these ...

Till the time i think that i will go for gl4j ( cause its more like openGL )..


one more problem ..
actually i ran i few gl4j ports of nehe''s tuts ..
and found 100 percent usage of my CPU ( 1.6 GHz P4 ) when running them .. i have an onboard graphics card of 32mb ram ..
waht does that mean .. i need to get better graphics card ..
and when i get 32 mb one will that reduce the CPU usage ?

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and it showed avg of 101 fps when running the examples at fullscreen
what does that mean is it good or bad ..
and meanwhile the CPU showed 100% usage

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The winner is going to be OpenGL bindings for Java. Sun is officially going to support OpenGL because OpenGL is multiplatform and is also hardware accelerated by most gfx cards. You won''t have to use wrappers anymore and you will also be able to use all the latest features of OpenGL when it is released.

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quote:
Original post by GamerSg
The winner is going to be OpenGL bindings for Java. Sun is officially going to support OpenGL because OpenGL is multiplatform and is also hardware accelerated by most gfx cards. You won''t have to use wrappers anymore and you will also be able to use all the latest features of OpenGL when it is released.


Yes that is what i wanted to know ..
what i am most interested in is whether SUN is going to come out
with its own Official bindings ( not like J3D but more like GL4J which are more openGL then anything else ( i was told this by other message posters on this site that J3D is just mapping and doesnt feel like programming in OpenGL like it feels in C and C++ ) .. anyways )

Are there any future prospects for that from SUN ?
( i think that some standard framework or sdk from SUN would be better than others cause it becomes widely accepted ..
but that doesnt mean that other developers who are doing this would get rob of the credit, cause they are the ones who did it first ! )

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The others(gl4Java) are merely provinding wrapper classes for you to access the OpenGl dll commands. Once Sun officially supports OpenGL, there wont be a need for wrappers. As to when this is going to happen, im not sure, but i do know that work has started on it and it shouldnt be too long.

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quote:
Original post by gamersg:
The winner is going to be OpenGL bindings for Java. Sun is officially going to support OpenGL because OpenGL is multiplatform and is also hardware accelerated by most gfx cards. You won''t have to use wrappers anymore and you will also be able to use all the latest features of OpenGL when it is released.



Isn''t this what jogl is?

quote:
From https://jogl.dev.java.net/:
The JOGL Project hosts a reference implementation of the Java bindings for OpenGL API, and is designed to provide hardware-supported 3D graphics to applications written in Java. It is part of a suite of open-source technologies initiated by the Game Technology Group at Sun Microsystems.

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