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What language to learn?

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Out of all the languages that are used, which should I learn? I don''t particularly want to learn C++ as everyone seems to choose it and I want to be different, but if you all insist then I guess I will learn it. And also, once I have chosen a language, will anyone give me some 1 to 1 lessons to get me started please?

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Question(s) 1:

What are your goals? What do you want to achieve with programming?



Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

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I would learn C++ anyway, if i would be you.

As so many people use it there is a lot of support and there are also many tutorials and examples.
Also many of the libraries available on the internet (like those for graphics, sound, input, etc.) are only available for C++.

I started programming in Basic, which is somewhat easier to learn, but I am glad I started to program in C++ after a while, it has alot advantages.

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
Well, ultimately I want to work with AI but for now I am thinking about programming involving complex maths formulae, as I find maths the easiest subject at school.


If you like maths and AI you might want to check out one of the languages in the functional family like Standard ML or Scheme. Those langauges are very different from mainstream langauges like C++/Java/C# etc., but very popular in AI and academic circles. Scheme is a blast and used at MIT's 1. year programming course - you can find the textbook here: Link.

Or you could choose one of the more conventional languages like Java or C++.



Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

[edited by - rohde on December 15, 2003 4:11:09 PM]

[edited by - rohde on December 15, 2003 4:12:44 PM]

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Rohde: You've been very helpful, I will check out the Scheme book thingy.

JuNC: Don't worry, I won't be doing C++, it's too mainstream for me, I like to be different.

EDIT: I have decided to learn scheme (assuming that it is the language that Rohde gave a link to), it seems rather interesting and looks quite potent at what I want from a programming language.

[edited by - mickygor on December 15, 2003 4:21:16 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
Rohde: You've been very helpful, I will check out the Scheme book thingy.

JuNC: Don't worry, I won't be doing C++, it's too mainstream for me, I like to be different.

EDIT: I have decided to learn scheme (assuming that it is the language that Rohde gave a link to), it seems rather interesting and looks quite potent at what I want from a programming language.

[edited by - mickygor on December 15, 2003 4:21:16 PM]


Here are som links:

The MIT First-year programming home-page at their OpenCourseWare (they use Scheme and it's where I got the link to he book): Link
A ton of info on Scheme: Schemers

Further, you can also get help on Scheme on these boards. Scheme is a Lisp dialect and many of the regulars here are Schemers/Lispers (bishop_pass comes to mind).

Good luck in your endeavours.



Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

[edited by - rohde on December 15, 2003 4:26:49 PM]

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Excellent choice, Scheme is a Lisp variant (well..) and is very powerful.

Some people like static type systems offered by the ML language family (Standard ML/OCaml etc.) or Haskell. Python is a very nice ''practical'' language which is quite scalable from small scripts to large apps. You might also like Prolog, which is a quite different paradigm than the above. Just some to keep in mind for later (of course there are many others )

One small caveat to this: it is quite likely that at some point you will have to be at least a little comfortable with C, since it is the lowest common denominator for interfacing languages together. Don''t let that worry you though, you can avoid it if you try

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Thanks again Rohde, I hope that I can get a lot of help from these forums

EDIT:
JuNC, I'm sure I can avoid C if I put effort into it, people must have got by before C was first implemented.

[edited by - mickygor on December 15, 2003 4:36:47 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
I don''t particularly want to learn C++ as everyone seems to choose it and I want to be different,

HA HA HA HA HA!

at least you thought it out well and made a good decision based on important factors, such as how different it makes you!

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Yeah, I''m not sure if obscurity is a good quality in a language. I''m not trying to say that you should learn c++ and not one of the other languages cited.

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quote:
Original post by Rayno
Yeah, I''m not sure if obscurity is a good quality in a language.


What?





Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

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quote:
JuNC: Don''t worry, I won''t be doing C++, it''s too mainstream for me, I like to be different.

It''s not the language that makes you different. It''s what you do with it. Why not learn c++ AND a functional language?

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
Out of all the languages that are used, which should I learn? I don''t particularly want to learn C++ as everyone seems to choose it and I want to be different, but if you all insist then I guess I will learn it. And also, once I have chosen a language, will anyone give me some 1 to 1 lessons to get me started please?


I guess you''re a newb because you''ve only just registered and are asking for 1 on 1 lessons. This forum will provide you with all kinds of answers to questions. However, the best way of working with this is to be reading a book, or a tutorial and then ask specific questions in relation to what you are learning. This is a free service and we do this in our own free time. If you want one on one lessons you should expect to pay for them.

I''d really recommend getting a good book for C++, and if you are learning Python too (which I''d thoroughly recommend), read through the documentation that comes with the distribution or on the website.

I''d also recommend Ruby as an interesting language which would be useful to teach you a number of things. There is a pretty good free book that you can get off the ruby-lang website.

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
Don''t worry, I won''t be doing C++, it''s too mainstream for me, I like to be different.


I was under the impression that everything ended up as 1''s and 0''s on your hard drive anyways?

Why worry about being different?

I think the bottum line is simple to get the computer to do what you want it to. If you can buy a program to do this, great. If you can make a program to do this, even better. If you can make programs that do what other people want, you can make some monies...

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quote:
Original post by nano
quote:
JuNC: Don''t worry, I won''t be doing C++, it''s too mainstream for me, I like to be different.

It''s not the language that makes you different. It''s what you do with it. Why not learn c++ AND a functional language?



What do you mean by "functional language"?

noob

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
,,,it''s too mainstream for me, I like to be different. ,,,


I''d hate to break it to you, but you aren''t different by trying to be different. There are people that try to be different, and people who don''t try. So, you still fall into either of those catagories.

my poetry

my programs

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quote:
Original post by dunkel3d
quote:
Original post by nano
quote:
JuNC: Don't worry, I won't be doing C++, it's too mainstream for me, I like to be different.

It's not the language that makes you different. It's what you do with it. Why not learn c++ AND a functional language?



What do you mean by "functional language"?

noob




A functional languages is a programming language that uses the functional paradigm compared to the imperative paradigm in C++, Java etc.

Basically functional languages is all about avoiding side effects and they are more like true mathematical functions which doesn't have side-effects either.

Check out Wikkiped (sp?) it has some nice aricles on it.

EDIT: Bad grammar



Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

[edited by - rohde on December 16, 2003 3:33:10 PM]

[edited by - rohde on December 16, 2003 3:33:48 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Mickygor, Scheme is a great choice, especially so for an AI and math freak. But getting free 1 to 1 lessons is probably too much to hope for. Just get a good book, study it well and post questions to some Scheme community site. I wouldn''t say the book cited here (Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, SICP) is one of the easiest beginner books out there, but at least it teaches a lot if you put an effort to it.
quote:
Original post by nano
Why not learn c++ AND a functional language?
Why learn C++? If he''s not into game programming, C++ won''t be very useful for him. If he needs a practical language to go with Scheme, C should be enough for many tasks as complementary to Scheme, and C would be a lot quicker to learn.

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quote:
Original post by Mickygor
quote:
Original post by Cyber-Ace
Why worry about being different?



That goes much furthur beyond the realms of cumputers...

...and into the realms of spelling...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hi!

I think that lisp is a good language for AI and other related subjects as that was the language that we used in the AI course
I took. It was very easy to make search algo''s and the AI assignment we got.

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