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Your University Calculus Book

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Hey guys, I was wondering what text your University uses (or did use if you graduated) for Calculus 1, 2, 3. Mine use''s Stewart''s. It would be interesting to see what other people use, and their opinions on their books.

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I''d be interested in what other people''s opinions are on Stewarts?

I also would like to see if anyone uses Spivak (which I heard is pretty tough) or Thomas and Finney (which I heard is also pretty tough).

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I'm at Dartmouth, where I'm in the Integrated Math/Physical Sciences (IMPS) program (as different from standard Calc). We use what is is AFAIK not a publically available textbook, which simultaneously teaches a lot of calculus and mechanics. Its a rather unique class in that it teaches calc in an applied setting, and I'm a huge fan. That said, a large number of people dropped early because they were used to traditional course formats and were frustrated by the emphasis on visualization and concepts and by the lack of algorithmic "Do A, then B, then C to solve the problem" techniques. The course is essentially multivariable vector calc with a hint of physics. Good stuff.

Since the course and text are rather non-traditional, many people also use auxiliary calc books; and, as much as I love our textbook, you do need some other resources. I've got no complaints; I just use google.

[edited by - TerranFury on December 16, 2003 1:14:59 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
My University uses Spivak for the Advanced Calculus course. I
loved it. I recommend it to anyone who wants a rogourus look at
introductory real analysis.

srcarrel at uwaterloo dot ca

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Mine used Robert A. Adams: "Calculus: A Complete Course".

I recmmoned Thomas'' Calculus instead though, the Adams one is not that good.



Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.

William James (1842 - 1910)

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We used Salas and Hill for "1, 2, and 3" (UT actually has just 1 and 2, combining the first two into one class). For vector cal, we used Marsden and Tromba.

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For Calculus 1 and 2 we used Ellis and Gulick''s "Calculus with Analytic Geometry". For Differential Equations, we used Paul Davis'' "Differential Equations for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering"

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Angelo State University used to use Stewart''s multivariable calc book. They''ve recently changed books, and the only thing I know is that its blue. (I think that. I didn''t see it - a friend did.)

I kinda like Stewart''s book. There are very confusing parts to it, and other parts are really well explained. Overall, I like the book. I hear that there are errors in it, but amongst myself and all my friends, we''ve only run across 2. (Probably just the selection we''ve done)

Scout



All polynomials are funny - some to a higher degree.
Furthermore, polynomials of degree zero are constantly funny.

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we use James Stewarts Multivariable calculus.

Basic reason is that it has everything in it, is easy to follow (when your lecture room is next to a bar - easy to follow is VERY handy) and you can self learn if you miss lectures etc. That and it has very good examples (hence the self learning part).

The one I used was the "Customised Version" of his book. I study Engineering as a Major, and do some Physics Electives in it.

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Edwards and Penney here at Kansas State (actually, I think they changed it last year). I don''t really have any strong opinions about it since I haven''t ever used a different Calc book.

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Hi, im from Brazil and my professor made a compilation of the books he thought wold be of better understandment for us... It became very useful indeed... About 300 pages only for calculus 3, and 150 pages for calculus 1 and 2!!!

To code is to make things come to life

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john_in_pdx,

At OSU, we use "Calculus with Analytic Geometry". by Robert Eliis and Denny Gulick. The books alright (it better be, cause i taught myself from the book, stinkin math professors that are too smart for their own good). This was my calc book for about 5 classes

-brad

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Stewarts for calc 1-3 again...
I don''t like it: Its not very rigorous, I think.


I also have 3rd edition of Larson, Hostetler, and although its older, its more rigorous.

I''ll see if I can''t find Spivak and check it out, I''m kind of interested in elementry analysis as a hobby right now.

~V''lion

Bugle4d

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A professor at the university I go to wrote his own calculus books. I''ve seen two of them so far: one for single variable calculus and one for multivariable calculus. His textbooks are extremely rigorous as far as I can tell. He presents detailed proofs for every lemma, theorem, and proposition (except those beyond the scope of the book, which aren''t many) and builds many of the concepts from basic definitions. The exercise questions are difficult and usually involve complex algebra as well as mastery of past and present concepts. All lemmas, theorems, and propositions are referenced by number. These books have broken my math spirit and scarred me emotionally. I was planning to take a third-year course in calculus but now I''ve decided against it.

I do plan to keep the books though; they may come in handy later, even if they weren''t the best for learning the calculus.

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Thomas and Finney is pretty much the standard undergraduate text for simple first year calculus ( I have no idea what you mean by I,II and III, do you guys have standard modules for your degrees or something? ). Kreyszig ( sp? ) "Engineering Mathematics" is also good, but a little more advanced.

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