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PixelDuck

What do you people expect from a 3D engine license?

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Hi, When licensing a 3D graphics library (or engine), what do you people expect to get in the package? Do you expect to get the whole source? Or does it suffice to get the header files, which are used in linking with the library, the library it self and ofcourse an extensive documentation explaining the inner doings too? What about if you get it for a lower price, say half the price of Gamebryo with 10% off of the support prices? And would a royalty fee of about 1-2% ruin the deal? And howabout a dual pricing scheme where you could choose between high royalty versus no royalty with a higher per-buy cost? And what do you then expect from an evaluation version? Timo Heubach Graphics Programmer Founder of Radiant Raccoon

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by PixelDuck
When licensing a 3D graphics library (or engine), what do you people expect to get in the package? Do you expect to get the whole source? Or does it suffice to get the header files, which are used in linking with the library, the library it self and ofcourse an extensive documentation explaining the inner doings too?


Make two separate licensing options. A full one with all source, and a less expensive one with libs and headers only. Extensive documentation is an absolutely must for both packages.

quote:

And would a royalty fee of about 1-2% ruin the deal? And howabout a dual pricing scheme where you could choose between high royalty versus no royalty with a higher per-buy cost?


That''s common practice.

quote:

And what do you then expect from an evaluation version?


Full documentation. Full engine capabilities, restricted on a few given sample levels (no export/import and precalc functionality). If the engine was already used in commercial titles, then that helps tremendeously, of course.


- Alex

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Hi,

Thanks to you both. The price for the UnrealEngine2 engine is VERY high. Are there any more expensive engines available?

Any other opinnions?

Timo Heubach
Graphics Programmer
Founder of Radiant Raccoon

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The Quake 3 engine is about $250,000 I think. And id don''t just license it out to anyone anymore.

If I were going to license an AAA-level graphics engine, I''d expect source, technical support and lots of documentation. And lots of samples and demos to see where the engines strong/weak points are.

My Website | Everything you need to know about 3D Graphics | Google | Search the Forums

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@themonkster:
>>qube engine is mulitplatform and pc version is free
do this guys really making money with their product ? *g*g*
i can''t figure out any feature, which isn''t available in other, opensource, engines ?!



DJSnow
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The value of a game engine goes beyond just the ''features''. DirectX gives you all of the features you really need to make a top-notch game. Ease of efficient implementation, extensive documentation, and support are where it''s at, and I have yet to see an open-source solution that I would rate better than ''poor to fair'' in those categories.

Of course, I haven''t tried the Q engine yet, so I can''t say that it rates any better. The fact that it crosses platforms to XBox and PS2 is certainly an advantage over any of the open-source solutions that I have seen thus far, however.

Peace

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For indies, you''ll be hard pressed to find a license better than that of the Torque engine put out by GarageGames. $100 one time fee and no royalties until your sales exceed $50,000 (getting a boxed version out by a big publisher has different rules). The documentaion is weak right now, but they are working on it.

For pro game shops, the quality and features of the engine will definitely have an impact on their evaluation of the license.

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unreal 2 engine:
US$750,000 for one of the available platforms, plus US$100,000 for each additional platform.

pfff... easy, I have this money in my pants.

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Hi,

If you think of it, the UnrealEngine2 isn''t that expensive if you take into account all it encompasses. It''s a huge package containing pretty much all aspects of a game engine, not just rendering, but AI, audio and physics too (Karma license included), not to mention UnrealScript. Some parts of it are under licenses themselves, like Karma. Luckily they''ve added Pixomatic and Karma licenses into the license fees already.

So you all think the key for a successful 3D engine (not necessarely a full game engine) is that it has to be well documented, contain full source, reasonable pricing, exquisite support, easily customizable and easily updatable as well as generalized (without risking too much effectiveness)?

Timo Heubach
Graphics Programmer
Founder of Radiant Raccoon

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