Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

NTFS Not Supported by 2.4 and a Whole Mess of Problems

This topic is 5083 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

When trying to mount an NTFS partition on Fedora Core 1.0 (Red Hat 10.0, sort of) it tells me that my kernel doesn''t support it. I''ve tried using mount -t and I''ve tried putting the following in my fstab both with the same result: /dev/hda1 /ms ntfs ro,umask=000 0 0 So, basically I am assuming my only resort is to update my kernel from 2.4 to 2.6 but I can''t figure out for the life of me how to do it! Let alone how to get the kernel file onto my linux partition. Here''s the prediciment I''m in: My ethernet connection is built into my NForce 2, of which is not supported natively by Fedora Core. This means I can''t connect to the internet. And I can''t access my window$ partition because 2.4 doesn''t seem to support NTFS. So, the question is: What do I do? I have read through a lot of kernel.org and they don''t seem to be very helpful in terms of compiling and installing a kernel. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by clum
I''m not sure if 2.4 supports NTFS, but just because YOUR kernel doesn''t support NTFS doesn''t mean that 2.4 doesn''t. You have to install the NTFS drivers.

The official zorx website


2.4 does have NTFS support, although read-only. It is RH/FC specifically that do not ship with compiled NTFS drivers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So what do I do? I would like to compile the 2.6 kernel and put that in. Is that a good idea? I have only done kernel compilation in FreeBSD (which was very well documented, bravo BSD).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is your NTFS driver module loaded? Check the output of lsmod; if there''s an ntfs driver there, then it''s loaded but not working. If it''s not loaded, then try modprobe -l and look for ntfs. If there is one, then try modprobe ntfs and then mount it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by bernatk
> 2.4 does have NTFS support, although read-only.

To be painstakingly anal it supports both reading and writing.



To be painstakingly pragmatic, it would have been misleading to have mentioned that, given that write support is limited and fairly experimental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by bernatk
To be painstakingly anal it supports both reading and writing.

Yes, it can write NTFS, but it''s marked DANGEROUS in the kernel config, it will probably trash your file system, and you''d have to be pretty stupid to try it on a disk with any even remotely important data. There''s a reason why it forces windows to check the filesystem every time it writes to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by sbennett
Yes, it can write NTFS, but it's marked DANGEROUS in the kernel config, it will probably trash your file system, and you'd have to be pretty stupid to try it on a disk with any even remotely important data. There's a reason why it forces windows to check the filesystem every time it writes to it.


to be painstakingly ... ummm ... something .. you can only write to the version of NTFS from NT4, not the version used by XP (and that generation), which i would guess most people would be using.

quote:
Linux NTFS Project
Read support is fairly complete. It has incomplete write support for NT4 and it can damage NT4 data. Write support is disabled for Windows 2000, XP, 2003 even if one enables it in the kernel configuration.




[edited by - necromancer_df on January 13, 2004 5:26:29 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only way you are going to write from Linux onto your NTFS partition is to boot to Windows. They have tools like ExploreFS that will let you copy from Linux to Windows from Windows. Other than that, us dual booters are dead in the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by tgraupmann
The only way you are going to write from Linux onto your NTFS partition is to boot to Windows. They have tools like ExploreFS that will let you copy from Linux to Windows from Windows. Other than that, us dual booters are dead in the water.


there''s always the alternative solution of creating a fat32 partition for transferring stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites