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nickwinters

What exactly are .X files?

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I have been reading Tom Miller''s Managed DirectX: Kick Start. I''m currently on the section on Meshes. My question is, what exactly is a .X file? I know of Milkshape, Unreal, etc 3-d models. Is that what a .X file is? And how is a mesh different from a 3-d model? Thanks. -Nick

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No, no, no, Scully and Muldur solve X Files, not -dot- X Files. You have it all wrong! X Files = Scully & Muldur (and Agent Joanna Dark) but .X Files are definately a direct3d thing.

Ok. Jokes aside.

As stated above, x files are just a direct3d-specific format for storing meshes that can hold all sorts of meshes (standard, animated, skinned, etc). An X File is just different from other 3d model file format because it''s so easy to load into D3D. But in terms of what it is it''s just a file that represents a mesh.

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Its just a file format intended to reduce even more the portability of applications developed for Direct3D.

(Sorry, but 3D APIs should not define model formats, thats just wrong)



Looking for a serious game project?
www.xgameproject.com

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Guest Anonymous Poster
To be fair the .x format is a just a fileformat like any other. Microsoft as in all the things it doe''s - or rather documents - has made the format somewhat unaccessible,their documentation just confuses and confounds and you end up sifting through lots of shit getting bloody nowhere..., but the format itself is really quite nice, appart from stupid bloody GUIDS!!! What''s wrong with a unique name DoDo! It''s still bloody unique! Anywayz enough ranting, check out Jim''s adam''s Advanced Animation in DirectX. It discusses the .x file in detail and how to read it, and he makes it sound very simple indeed! Excellent book.

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This is my first project with DX9. I''ve written simple games like Pong, Tetris, 3D Pipes with OpenGL and Java, but would like to move to C# and DX. I''m going for a 3rd person action game. I don''t care if the men initially look like they''re made out of legos. Is it worth using Meshes and/or 3-d models? If so, what software and format would be easiest to start with?

Thanks.

-Nick

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Max_Payne
Its just a file format intended to reduce even more the portability of applications developed for Direct3D.



rolls eyes...

Look at the format spec. Not that different from any other format. Please explain how it reduces portability.

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quote:
Original post by nickwinters
This is my first project with DX9. I''ve written simple games like Pong, Tetris, 3D Pipes with OpenGL and Java, but would like to move to C# and DX. I''m going for a 3rd person action game. I don''t care if the men initially look like they''re made out of legos. Is it worth using Meshes and/or 3-d models? If so, what software and format would be easiest to start with?

Thanks.

-Nick


I''m somewhat trying for the same goal in C++ and I definately think it''s worth using the meshes. I currently am using .x files for all of my stuff (levels, people, items, etc) and it''s great, even if my player is composed of 5 rectangles and a sphere and looks a little robotic... :-p

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quote:
Original post by Max_Payne
Its just a file format intended to reduce even more the portability of applications developed for Direct3D.

(Sorry, but 3D APIs should not define model formats, thats just wrong)



Looking for a serious game project?
www.xgameproject.com


I fail to grap your logic. I for one think its of great benefit to anyone who uses direct X that you can, if you choose, easily load a model with the API. You can also certainly code you own loader for your own file format. Moreover, .X files are pretty simple and can be saved as text. Its easy enough to write your own loader for another platform; I fail to see how this in anyway locks you into Windows; it just makes Direct X more developer friendly.

Are you also going to argue that its some how nefarious that direct X can load textures from various file formats or that .dds is evil?

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