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Mari_p

The evolution of the computer graphics in 3D games

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I have just watched the movie "The Lord of the Rings - Return of the King".... one word: amazement. How many years will the 3D games take to reach that level of computer graphics?... if they reach...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
About 100 years to be honest.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The computers duplicate your capacity at each 18 months... it is exponential. But normally appear new CPU/GPU generations. Maybe in 10 years we will have fantastic graphics.

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In fact, the only thing that doesn''t seem to be increasing exponentially is the amount of time allocated to us developers to create the games

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While processor speed seems to follow an exponential curve, things like RAM speed are going to hold that back quite a bit.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The graphic artists have been more and more occupying their places in the games world. In the future, with power hardwares and super high level engines, the artists will can develop good games on a interface so easy to work as a 3d studio max or Maya... and it won''t be necessary to have a programmer for close. Of course the programmers will develop new tools, but the computer graphics will be so developed that the creativity and art quality will be an enough factor... differently than it happened in the past where graphic artists do nothing (no game) without a programmer for close.

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Electronic fields are only so small. Eventually, we will hit a cap on how small and how fast our computers can become. We''ll probably have to wait until they invent quantum computers before we can have those kinds of games.

Besides that, though, much more important than the graphics in a game is the gameplay. It is quite unfortunate that, in the computer gaming industsry, the QUALITY of the games doesn''t double every 18 months....

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Contrary to popular belief, quantum computers aren''t faster than regular computers at regular computing. Quantum computers work in a fundamentally different way, and can take advantage of that to be faster at some calculations (like factoring numbers), but for regular computing are generally slower (because you have to work around the differences instead of ultilizing them to your advantage unless you can come up with a good quantum algorithm to do what you want).

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Even if CPU and GPU speeds and power became huge, you''d have to then focus on the creation of life-like models and textures. You could argue that when people become more spoilt for quality, they won''t want all their enemies looking the same so models will need to be created for them too.

The next step in realism will be when computers can access your brain directly and allow you to conjure your own imaginative images internally

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quote:
Original post by Tac-Tics
Electronic fields are only so small. Eventually, we will hit a cap on how small and how fast our computers can become. We''ll probably have to wait until they invent quantum computers before we can have those kinds of games.

The 0.13 micron processor architecture currently in use in today''s Pentium 4 chips is not far from the absolute physical limit of processor minification. Once you get down below 0.10 micron, you have a problem: the gap in a transistor which is set to off is so small that an electron can jump it, rendering the transistor useless. The solution to this problem is a processor which uses photons (light, basically) as opposed to electrons to do the work. It''s predicted that photon processors will be in use within the next ten years, and my Computer Systems lecturer made a conservative estimate that in twenty years, Moore''s Law will cease to apply, as processors will be as small as they can get.

As for the CG aspect of computer games, consider this: when Pixar Studios created Luxo Jr. in 1985, some frames took up to 70 minutes to render on the hardware available. The modern GeForce 3 can run Luxo Jr. in realtime, with (it seems) all the options the pre-rendered 1985 version had. Within a few years, it''s conceivable that we''ll be playing games with graphics comparable to Toy Story or Monsters, Inc. Then, as mentioned above, quality will become an issue. Models, textures and environments will need to be extremely detailed, and Half-Life will look even older than it does now...


Windows 95 - 32 bit extensions and a graphical shell for a 16 bit patch
to an 8 bit operating system originally coded for a 4 bit microprocessor,
written by a 2 bit company that can''t stand 1 bit of competition.

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