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Noky

Visual C++ 5

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Being the broke teenager I am, I only have Visual C++ 5. Now what I want to know is can this old version of the software still get the job done. Specifically when it comes to compiling some of the free engines of today (like Nebula2 more specifically). If not, should I upgrade to one of the newer version (6 or .NET as money allows) or go with a current version of a free compiler. The deal w/ a free compiler is I''m wary if I can actually create commercial titles (as if I''ll be doing any of that this year, hah!) with it (legally). Are there any good reasons to upgrade to a new version and/or compiler even if VC++ 5 can do what I need it to, maybe just not as well? Thanks for your time and help in advance. NOTE: How long have I been here and gotten absolutely nothing done in terms of programming progress, talk about procrastination...

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If you are a student, chances are you can get a (much) more recent version for not too much money.

Also, try to convince your parents to pay for it. Mine were happy to buy me VC6 years ago... You are learning and doing something productive after all.

-- Steve

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Well, it can get the job done, depending on what you use it for. If you are just using it for a c++ compiler, for example, it is just fine. If you want to get into .net, however, you will need to upgrade.

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Does VC++ 5 support COM objects? If not then you might have trouble with Direct X programming.

I can''t remember if COM support was added in 5 or 6 though.

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it must be in 5, because andre lamothe uses COM in the first edition of the "tricks.." book, and he writes somewhere, that he compiled all the code with Visual C++ 4.0 and 5.0

i hope i could help.

bony

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quote:
Original post by PSWind
Being the broke teenager I am, I only have Visual C++ 5. Now what I want to know is can this old version of the software still get the job done.


It will do fine. But it has annoying aspects, like when you:


for(int index = 0; index < 200; ++index)
{
// do stuff

}


the variable index persists until the next closing brace, rather than being local to the for loop itself (as in the standard).

I used VC++ 5 (borrowed from a friend's dad) until recently to do all my programming (including DirectX and all that), until I discovered how cheap Visual C++.net standard was, and bought a copy of it.

[edited by - furby100 on January 7, 2004 3:45:16 PM]

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If you are a student then Microsoft does versions of Visual Studio .NET under an Academic License which allows you to get a full copy of VS.NET at a greatly reduced cost.

I''m not sure what the restrictions of the license are - i''m guessing you won''t be able to sell any of your software you develop in it.

My 2D game engine

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quote:
Original post by Spudder
If you are a student then Microsoft does versions of Visual Studio .NET under an Academic License which allows you to get a full copy of VS.NET at a greatly reduced cost.

I''m not sure what the restrictions of the license are - i''m guessing you won''t be able to sell any of your software you develop in it.

My 2D game engine


The standard edition of Visual C++.net is fairly cheap anyway. I paid £79.99 for mine.

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I didn''t realize how inexpensive the standalone C++ was now - thought be it some hundreds or so dollars. But I surfed online real quick and found a copy of Standard for about 100. I figure I''ll just work with VC++ 5 until this summer when I get a job then use that money for a copy of .NET. At this time I''m not really interested in .NET just Direct X (8/9).

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