Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

VC++ 6 Or 2003 .NET

This topic is 5248 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hey, i''ve been learning C++ and using VC++ 6 Indroductory (learning) Edition as my compiler... Now its all I need for learning, but soon i''ll be moving on to DirectX and more advanced stuff, and so I''m curious of what I Should get. VC++ 2003 .NET or VC++ 6.0 I''ve heard mostly good about both so i''m not sure which one to get. Opinions (not flames) would be greatly appreciated. - Travis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
2003 is a much, much, much better compiler than 6.0. It''s more standards compliant, and generates faster code. It works with boost, loki, and other weird "modern" c++ libraries. The IDE is generally improved as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just as the poster above me said, the 2003 version is just a giant update over the 6.0 compiler. You will get smaller, faster and better code. The debugger has been updated as well, so debugging will be easier. I reccomend .NET.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by biovenger
Just as the poster above me said, the 2003 version is just a giant update over the 6.0 compiler. You will get smaller, faster and better code. The debugger has been updated as well, so debugging will be easier. I reccomend .NET.


Note that the Standard version (about $100) of Visual C++ .net (2003) doesn''t do optimizations. So I''m not sure you''ll get faster code over 6.0 unless you buy the Professional version ($1000+).

But I''d still get the Standard version of VC++ .net (2003) over 6.0 for the reasons mentioned already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by biovenger
Just as the poster above me said, the 2003 version is just a giant update over the 6.0 compiler. You will get smaller, faster and better code. The debugger has been updated as well, so debugging will be easier. I reccomend .NET.


Note that the Standard version (about $100) of Visual C++ .net (2003) doesn''t do optimizations. So I''m not sure you''ll get faster code over 6.0 unless you buy the Professional version ($1000+).

But I''d still get the Standard version of VC++ .net (2003) over 6.0 for the reasons mentioned already.


That''s correct though. An optimized VC6 produces faster code than an unoptimized .NET.

Although, he asked for a general comparison since he doesn''t seem to have price issues. Also, for pure learning purposes (since you are learning Hysteria) I''d go with the .NET compiler, if nothing, only for the greater compliance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''ve got the academic version of .NET 2003 for $100 at school. Some schools they even give it away for free. There is no difference between the academic and the professinal versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Other features that haven''t been mentioned:
Being able to compile at warning level 4 without any spurious STL warnings is worth the upgrade from VC6 alone.

Not to mention they removed all false positives in the leak tracking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sweet thank you guys. I can only afford Standard right now, but that won''t be any problem for the time being. Thanks again.

- Travis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by darkchrono4
I''ve got the academic version of .NET 2003 for $100 at school. Some schools they even give it away for free. There is no difference between the academic and the professinal versions.


There is a difference, being that academic has a few more things than pro
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/productinfo/overview/academic/features/comparison.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!