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Is c++ gonna die

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Hi people. I was reading a lot of posts on c# better than c++ or c++ better than c#. But thats not my interest. So the people that like to argue about that here is not the place. I do not in any purpose whant to start a flame war. So now here the question. Is c++ going to stop being used like it is know. By this I mean will c# get the majority of the programming books. Like instead of making a book like "Role Playing games whit Directx 8.0" Using the c++ language will they eventualy almost all use c#. By that I mean will c# be one of the most important language on the market like c++ is know. And my secound question is how is c# different from c++. Cause if c# will be the c++ of tommorow might as well know it. Kevin

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On Windows, probably. I am still using C++ to practice memory management, becuase I don''t plan on staying with Windows forever.

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C++ replaced C but C hasn't died. It's still pretty widely used. I haven't tried c# yet but i dont think that it was made for making games. So no , I don't think C++ will die.

[edited by - santonel on January 11, 2004 8:14:03 PM]

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Heck, even Fortran is still widely used.


“Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it.”
— Brian W. Kernighan (C programming language co-inventor)

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The market and business itself will drive whether c++ begins to get replaced with C#..

Schools still teach C/C++ as the primary language in degree programs and that is what graduate students know. Application development proceeds with C/C++ due to the simple fact that it is the defacto language in which developers are comfortable with developing in.

Until we begin seeing a major transition within the corporate world it's safe to assume that C/C++ is here to stay for quite awhile longer

With that in mind, the fact of the matter is business is not just going to turnaround and say, "hey this C# thing looks pretty nifty. Lets give it a shot!" If it ain't broke, don't fix it (re: using C/C++).


[edited by - _vizual_ on January 11, 2004 8:22:45 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Penguins
what about D? isnt D being developed and highly praised?


No.

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quote:
Original post by _vizual_ If it ain''t broke, don''t fix it (re: using C/C++).

A lot of people view C/C++ as fundamentally broken languages.

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C didn''t die, and didn''t get replaced by C++.
Game developers may pick C++ because of OO nature, but C code will still run faster
Don''t forget about incompatibility of C++ compilers ... for example if you have a library built with g++ 2.95 and link it against g++ 3.X library - it won''t work ... this becomes a problem if you would like to use both libraries and have no source for them (so you can''t recompile them). C doesn''t have this problem.
C# has a long way to go ... first of all it has to be supported on Unix.


http://www.anywherenotes.com - never lose another note again.

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quote:
Original post by abeylin
C didn''t die, and didn''t get replaced by C++.
Game developers may pick C++ because of OO nature, but C code will still run faster



This is still quite a common misconception. The modern day C++ and C# compilers actually produce a higher performing application:

http://img.osnews.com/img/5602/results.jpg

It all depends on compiler.. not language. Microsoft C++ and C# compilers are faster than coding something in C and compiling with GCC.


And to the rest of the thread... NO, C++ will NEVER die. All low level things on Windows Longhorn will remain to be coded in C++ and ASM (drivers, etc).. Linux applications, MacOS applications, UNIX applications, console applications/games.. these things will continue using C++.

Linux may see a lot more in the C# department due to Mono.. but remember that everything Novell purchases dies =]

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quote:
Original post by _vizual_
Schools still teach C/C++ as the primary language in degree programs and that is what graduate students know. Application development proceeds with C/C++ due to the simple fact that it is the defacto language in which developers are comfortable with developing in.



Actually it depends on what schools. The top schools in the world for comp sci and software engineering don''t teach C++ at all.

Java, Scheme, SmallTalk, etc are used by the top schools.

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Lisp is like 50 years old and it hasn''t died.

BTW, is there a university that still teaches C?

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quote:
Original post by jmg5
BTW, is there a university that still teaches C?


That question is fundamentally equivalent to asking if a university teaches any math or english classes.

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C# will likely not be used to create big projects they already have a decompiler for it however they REPLACED THE COLLEGES ADVANCED C++ CLASS I WAS GONNA TAKE WITH C# !@!(&#(^!$ damn them!!

[edited by - DevLiquidKnight on January 11, 2004 8:52:07 PM]

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quote:
This is still quite a common misconception. The modern day C++ and C# compilers actually produce a higher performing application:

http://img.osnews.com/img/5602/results.jpg

gcc compiles slower code than VC++, so that''s not a fair comparison between C and C++.
Better would be gcc vs g++.
Are there graphs for that?

C++ doesn''t call "main" directly, it calls "__" before, so it can''t possibly be faster.

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If game programming books switched to C#, they''d be tied to Microsoft for no good reason. Hobbyists might not mind, but most professional game developers will want their code to run on many platforms, with no, or slight modifications. Unless MS can convince Sony, and Nintendo to use C# for their consoles, game developers will try to steer clear of C#. I''m not even going to try to figure out if MS''s own console group would try the switch. They''re the new kid on the console block, and pulling a stunt like that for XBox Next could be all that most developers need to know before avoiding it like the plague.

So, no, not any time soon, and probably not ever, though you will find SOME books that cover that niche. I''d avoid such a book though, as it''s declaring clearly that it doesn''t care about your professional future, and just wants a quick buck from the hobby coder.

Some other language may replace C++ eventually, but not something proprietary and controlled like C#.

That''s my view of it.

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im kinda mad i got the new Visual Studio C++ .net 2003 and it didnt come with C#.... kinda really agravates me.. The only thing I find erm.. messed up is the new M$ longhorn that will be coming out is written mostly in C#... However one good side of this is that we all can have the source code to much of it sense there is a decompiler, unless that changes... However.. http://longhorn.msdn.microsoft.com/this website shows SDK examples I found that it does not show very many C++ examples.. no idea why this is 0.o tons for C# and vb.net i can imagin that ms is thinking OH its gonna be 64 bit chipsets so it will be faster which means OMG everyone learn vb.net we can use that now and no one can say it lags cuz we use 64 bit chipsets, so they wont see the lag even though we know it sucks horribly.

[edited by - DevLiquidKnight on January 11, 2004 9:00:03 PM]

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Wasn’t C# created to compete against Java? C# hooks into the .net framework just like java hooks into the Java Virtual Machine (JVM).

So I do not think that C++ will go away anytime soon. It’s still way too important in the marketplace on all platforms to just be cast aside. In fact I do not see many universities teaching C# yet.

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quote:
Original post by DevLiquidKnight
im kinda mad i got the new Visual Studio C++ .net 2003 and it didnt come with C#.... kinda really agravates me



You bought C++ and are upset that you didn''t get C# for free? That''s like buying a movie and then complaining that they didn''t give you another movie with it. However, if you had bought Visual Studio, it would be understandable.

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quote:
Original post by PlayGGY
quote:
Original post by Penguins
what about D? isnt D being developed and highly praised?


No.




*tear* does anyone know anything about d? i came across this [url]http://www.digitalmars.com/d/[/url] where it has a nice chart explaining why d is better than c++ and java

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quote:
Original post by Namethatnobodyelsetook
If game programming books switched to C#, they''d be tied to Microsoft for no good reason. Hobbyists might not mind, but most professional game developers will want their code to run on many platforms, with no, or slight modifications. Unless MS can convince Sony, and Nintendo to use C# for their consoles, game developers will try to steer clear of C#. I''m not even going to try to figure out if MS''s own console group would try the switch. They''re the new kid on the console block, and pulling a stunt like that for XBox Next could be all that most developers need to know before avoiding it like the plague.

So, no, not any time soon, and probably not ever, though you will find SOME books that cover that niche. I''d avoid such a book though, as it''s declaring clearly that it doesn''t care about your professional future, and just wants a quick buck from the hobby coder.

Some other language may replace C++ eventually, but not something proprietary and controlled like C#.

That''s my view of it.



Actually, those are some of the best points I have seen. Great thinking!

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quote:
Original post by cowsarenotevil
quote:
Original post by DevLiquidKnight
im kinda mad i got the new Visual Studio C++ .net 2003 and it didnt come with C#.... kinda really agravates me



You bought C++ and are upset that you didn''t get C# for free? That''s like buying a movie and then complaining that they didn''t give you another movie with it. However, if you had bought Visual Studio , it would be understandable.




Doesn''t the .net framwork come with a compiler built in that has all the components needed for C#? I thought I read that somewhere.

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yea.. i read that C# came with the .net framwork but it didn't... thats main reason im mad

[edited by - DevLiquidKnight on January 11, 2004 9:01:43 PM]

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