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what features should a good engine have

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I would like to know: what features should a good 3D engine have so that you would pay 20$ for its source? I would like to know your opinion very much! Before answering look at the price one more time

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It depends on what type of 3D engine you're talking about. A 3D engine for first person shooter games? A 3D engine for MMORPG games? You need to be more specific...

[edited by - Chacha on January 12, 2004 9:25:44 AM]

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With so many high quality free game/gfx engines out there, i doubt anyone would pay for one.

Also, most of the people here on these forums either use these high quality engines or make their own. Most of those who make their own do so for learning purposes rather then make some money out of it.

Im not saying that you shouldnt aim to make money out of it. But for a start, you will have to offer something significantly more than all the other free engines out there. Some of them are even Open Source.

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yep, that seems to be just the problem with engines. there doesnt seem to be much between free open source already-close-to-commercial engines and real commercial engines costing a fortune.

problem is: whatever work you would be willing to do for $20 is most likely a lot less than what many guys invested over many years in those free engines.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Good Lighting

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Here''s what I''d pay 20$ for :
- Portable engine : preferably using SDL, OpenGL(of course) and OpenAL
- Its own model file format, with an exporter plugin for 3DStudio or Milkshape3D, supporting skeletal animation and bump-mapping
- Dynamic Lighting
- Multi-Texturing
- Particle Engine
- Space Partitionning (be it Octrees, BSPs, Portals or whatever)
- Scripting System
- Bump-Mapping
- Dynamic Shadows
- If it can display some kind of terrain : CLOD (chech out http://vterrain.org it''s a good source for terrain rendering algos)
- Sound Support : Ogg-vorbis file format
- Physics : collision detection and skeletal animation at least

All those (except for the model file format) can be done with ressources available on GameDev, GameTutorials, official sites of SDL, OpenGL, OpenAL, Ogg-vorbis, nVidia and ATI.

I think coming up with a model file format supporting skeletal animation and bump-mapping, providing AT LEAST one exporter, the complete format documentation, and a license that allows the buyer to do whatever he likes with it except selling it as he''s own work or giving it away for free, largely justifies paying 20$ for the engine source AND design document (always helpful to have a generic idea how it works).

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I would say the single most important feature of an engine is EASE OF USE. And then features.

Look at it this way, you want to charge $20. So who will pay $20? The BIG games companies certainly won''t. They have tons o cash, they''ll buy a "real engine".

so you are left with amateurs who either are making a game for fun or people who want to make a commercial game but have limited funds to work with.

That being said, I really think your biggest feature should be ease of use, because there are already opensource engines available. But if you made an engine with a reasonable decent feature set that was drop dead easy to use (ie off the ground and going in less than an 30 minutes of coding) you might could actually sell it for $20.

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It''s true that there are many excellent open source game engine''s out there.. To be honest, there''s just so many resources for the budding young amateur developer these days that he''s spoilt for choice.

If you''re going to make a half way decent game engine, then I suggest you write a book on it, because you''re more likely to get published and make money off a book than just the source code. I have personally downloaded and viewed 3 dozen modern game engine''s (Including the QuakeII source code - which let''s face it would take some beating).

I think it''s terrible that our skills are worth so little, but unfortunately that''s just the sad reality of it. You''d make more money (plenty more in fact) scrubbing toilets for a living.

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