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Age average to work in game industry

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Well, I love computer programming. I love to think me working in a game industry. So I´d like to work in a game industry. But I am 30 years old. I think I am old to work in game industry. What do you think? I studying Computer Degree. I finished it when I will be 34 years old. But I see young men begining when they are 12 years old. I stay very sad because of that. They begin so earlier. I think I am so old to work in a game industry What do you think about that?

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You are fine! But do you know any laungeges like:
C
C++
Java
Flash

Other people would say you are too old. Most game makers usually start when they are 14 and decide to learn code. They usually have a PC or MAC at their disposal, with some knid of interent connection (usually Broadband!)
Your choice if you want to work in the Game Industry. I suggest making yoyr own team when you feel ready. Or you could join an existing one.

WICKED PUBLISHING!
INDEPENDENT PUBLISHER
AND GAME DEVELOPMENT TEAM
Ben@Wickedarcade.co.uk

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Sure you see them begin at 12, but do they ever finish anything?
I''d think it shouldn''t matter as long as you can show you know what you''re doing. Some employers might like a younger kid so they can "mold them" but others might prefer an older coder, because older people are generally perceived to have more experience.
So it basically all depends who you ask.
IMHO the industry itself is too young to really judge..

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Well, it all comes down to your experience, your abilities, and your willingness to sacrifice yourself to the cause. I understand it''s improving, but it''s still a no-joke/way-over-40-hour workweek environment and if you have a family and/or a reasonable social life, SOMETHING is going to suffer. Ask yourself.. do you want to do this? If so...

..I''d have to say you''d be better off doing what a previous poster said - grab a compiler, some books, and dive in on your own! Unless you can show SOMETHING game-oriented you''re going to have a hard time breaking in. The indie game scene is pretty active, and while 90% of the teams break up due to lack of non-technical skills and/or a less-than-30-second attention span (lol) SOME survive and SOME even make it into Independent Games Festival. You don''t HAVE to sell your soul to a Big Company right away.. but then.. you''re not likely going to make a living wage going the indie route either.

I know a few folks older than me in the biz (and I''m 44), but they''re mostly in management and production now and don''t code. Coders are slowly becoming a commodity item, and I wouldn''t be too suprised to see game coding jobs start getting offshored by larger companies soon as 3D programming skills improve in other countries (and there are some HOT 3D coders in Russia).

No matter which way you go, good luck!

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<< But I am 30 years old. I think I am old to work in game industry. >>

Naw, I''m 38 and just finished my B.S. CompSci. Now get some LaMothe and kick those 12 year olds a**.

Phil P

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No.. not LaMothe! He has bad coding practices. Copy and pasting straight from his texts is why the 12 year olds suck so much :-p

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Is a 12 year old capable of understanding the complex mathematical concepts invloved in advanced 3D engine design?

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quote:
Original post by DerAnged
im 15 do i ever finish anything! i started at 12. and look at me a success!

To be honest: I see nothing! And I think it takes more to be a professional game programmer than a 15 year old guy can think about (please don''t take this as an offence).

@laurobezerra:
It might be interesting what you have done before. You mentioned that some started with 12 years. Yes, that might be. But the learning process at this time is much slower. I would really wonder if a 12 year old child can tell you something about geometry algebra, complex numbers, etc. You have the advantage that you can learn all these thing (when you don''t know them yet) much faster.

The first time I worked in a company I realized that being a programmer is more than just writing code and having fun.
I won''t say anything about the non-fun-part because other people did before (no code-> no money).
I''ve learned more in the first month than I might have learned in the last year at that time. Suddenly I had also to work with photshop, some music-programs, other programming languages, etc. (ok, nothing special, all what you could learn in a few days, but those have been things I would never used in my sparetime).
The climate was a different one: deadlines, from time to time a bit more pressure, arranging the communication with several people, writing tons of documentation and so on.

Depending on what you have done before you might have a plus.

Also, as others mentioned before: when you are good you will find work. I would wonder if e.g. Stephen Hawkings [insert anybody you want to who''s good] would find no work just because he''s old.

You''ve got now 4 years until your degree. Write lots of code to have a portfolio, improve yourself beside your studying (learning an instrument, a (non-computer) language, art skills, whatever). The more varied you are the better. Some skills might seem not to be that useful to get into the industry at the first glance but sometimes life is full of suprises ;-)

Just my 2 cents.

btw.: just re-read your post: what have you got in mind to work as?

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You are fine. Not to mention you have something that the "12 year old coder" wouldn''t understand. Your experience with games has progressed from the time they started, or damn close to it. If you started with the original pong with the dial controls and remained playing the games through the 80''s, 90''s and present you have a solid foundation of what has been done along with what was successful and what wasn''t. Not by reading a web page but through personal experience playing them. 30, hell you are still on the first leg of the race. Now is when it gets interesting! Good luck!



"If you are not willing to try, you will never succeed! If you never succeed, are you really trying?"

Grellin

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quote:
Original post by laurobezerra
Well,

I love computer programming. I love to think me working in a game industry. So I´d like to work in a game industry. But I am 30 years old. I think I am old to work in game industry. What do you think?
I studying Computer Degree. I finished it when I will be 34 years old. But I see young men begining when they are 12 years old. I stay very sad because of that. They begin so earlier. I think I am so old to work in a game industry

What do you think about that?




Yeah, those young men you speak of never get laid either. The game industry is a total bitch and you will have to work your ass off and turnover rates are insane so you will be always worried about getting laid off. Good luck man (sincere, no sarcasm here).

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"Coders are slowly becoming a commodity item"
I agree. And coding will just get easier as things progress.
But good game designers will always be hard to find (apparently..)

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I had exactly the same dilemma. 32 yrs old final year Bsc. The reason i got into IT was cos of my interst in games + programming them. Since then every year of study, i have created graphics progs as projects. This years its "D3D programming techniques"

Nice to know Im not the only 1. Thanks for all of your views.

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quote:
Original post by Jockel
To be honest: I see nothing! And I think it takes more to be a professional game programmer than a 15 year old guy can think about (please don''t take this as an offence).



Like what?

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quote:
Original post by cowsarenotevil
I was. I''m 14 now.
Just to let you know that there is more than matrices and trigs in 3D math.

There might be several exceptions for some people. But, generally, those kids have no clue what they are coding because they tend memorizing the code, not understanding it.

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quote:
Original post by alnite
Just to let you know that there is more than matrices and trigs in 3D math.

There might be several exceptions for some people. But, generally, those kids have no clue what they are coding because they tend memorizing the code, not understanding it.


I know. I''ve seen the effects of that, but I do know about 3D math. One of my first larger projects was a raycaster written in java. Of course there are still a lot of things I don''t know about 3D math, mostly pertaining to physics and calculus, but I am usually able to recognize when there''s some understandint that I lack, and ask for help. Hopefully I don''t sound too arrogant...

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DerAng its quite obvious that your not a complete success like come on look at your site! It''s so crappy and basic even when I was 8 I designed sites better then yours. And you shouldn''t call yourself a success your more like a failure. *No Offence* The truth had to be revealed.

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You can always become a good programmer. The people that started at twelve have had more time to practice coding, but you''ve had real work experience - so it kinda evens out. Besides, don''t worry about how you stack up aginst other programmers - concentrate on getting a game industry job and making yourself better.

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I''m 35 but I started when I was 12 :-) (more like 10, actually)

It takes dedication, smarts and an ability to get results. That''s all it takes.

Note that some companies are more family friendly than others. 18-hour work days don''t matter when you''re 24 and stupid about those things. It certainly does when you have a wife, children, and what most people call "a life." Accept 12 hours during crunch, and 9 hours normally; no more. Anything more will burn you out, anyway, which way nobody wins.

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