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sharpgames

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I''ve tried tutorials, and Sam''s 21 Days to learn C++ books, but for some reason the info just doesn''t seem to sink in. Got any tips for a new programmer? Any links to push me along? Please forgive me if this is a thread that has been posted a million times over, I''m just a bit frustrated.

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I started my programming adventure with that book. I had no experience what so ever about programming and now after three years and a couple of months I feel confident with C++.

There are no shortcuts when learning C++. I think the book did a good job of teaching it although I did struggle with some concepts like pointers, but then it seems everyone does. Also you must go one chapter at a time. I did read some of them quite many times to make sure I had understand what it was teaching.

You just have to stick with it. BTW internet is full of tutorials and learning material about C++, just use google. Perhaps you find a site that teaches something more clearly than the book, but other than that its all about your motivation.



"Life is very short, and there's no time for fussing and fighting my friend..."

[edited by - Kumppi on January 13, 2004 5:44:13 AM]

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When I first started coding in C, my previous experience was basic. believe me, you have it better off. Some of the things I strugled with were:
-WTF? Why should I have to declare variables?!
-what''s with the '';'' at the end of every line?
-TO MANY BRACKETS!

most of my issues were with syntax, the rest had to do with structuring and flow.
-no GOTO/GOSUB!

just keep trying. You will get it!

____________________________________________________________
The Santa Claus in the Lobby wants to kill me.

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quote:
Original post by PnP Bios

-WTF? Why should I have to declare variables?!
-what's with the ';' at the end of every line?
-TO MANY BRACKETS!

most of my issues were with syntax, the rest had to do with structuring and flow.
-no GOTO/GOSUB!

just keep trying. You will get it!

____________________________________________________________
The Santa Claus in the Lobby wants to kill me.




- variables have to be declared in order to reserve ram
- the ; comes after a statement
- the brackets are to show functions what their content is

-- edit: I just realised that you understand these things now, sorry...--



[edited by - picklejuice on January 13, 2004 1:43:10 PM]

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Start with simple assembly language programming.

x86 assembly is probably one of the easiest assembly languages to learn. This will give you a good concept of what''s really going on in a computer, and help you understand concepts of programming.. like for example pointers. Pluss, it''s not as hard as some people tend to think.

programmersheaven is a good place to start for assembly language tutorials.

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quote:
Original post by BiTwhise
Start with simple assembly language programming.


I strongly disagree with that!
It''s true that you will have a better understanding but if ''sharpgames'' is frustrated with C++ he will even be more frustrated with assembly.

I also recommend to learn assembly when you have understood the basic concepts of programming in one programming language (doesn''t matter which one), but for the beginning there are too many things in assembly which you have to think about.

Just my 2 cents.

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I guess you have a point.. this would vary from person to person.

Me, I fooled around with basic on my calc way back (which I wouldn''t really call programming). After that I started straight off with assembly.. again for my calc (along with some C just to generate sine tables, etc). It gave a good grasp of how a PC really works, and makes me think completely different when programming high level (like C/C++).

Again, it''s probably a matter of taste. I''m just suggesting that''s one way to go, and not necesarilly as hard as you might think.

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Of course assembly works for some people as first language. And as I said I would recommend learning assembly to get a better understanding.
I started programming with pascal and learned after that assembly and I found it pretty hard (maybe also because I only had one book as resource to learn it). I think I have a pretty strong knowledge in assembly now but my point is:
1) if the author of this post struggles with c++, will he not struggle with a language which needs more in-depth knowledge at the beginning?
2) if this book teaches ''real'' c++ (not a mix of c and c++) then I think it''s better to stick with it and learn the object-oriented paradigm instead of a language where you have almost no abstraction (i know that there are some attemptions to use oop with assembly). I think it''s pretty hard to USE oop when you have a procedual language as background.

But as mentioned before, both ways are possible and everybody has to decide on his own if it works or not.

btw.: sharpgames, where exactly do you struggle?

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