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where does the bios passwrod reside in the HD?

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HD = hard Drive yes!
i would understand where can i find the password that is request me by the Bios when i turn on the pc.

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You can''t, but you can turn off the password feature with a switch.

That''s the best workaround I can find.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
paulcesar:

it is in something called the CMOS. The internal memory for your bios. If you want to reset it for some reason or another, just open up your computer, and pull out the battery in your MothrBoard. This will reset your password (as well as your bios), but you should be able to access normaly then.

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I explain my goal:

i want make a little program to save on a Floppy.

when the pc is turned on the bios call the 1° boot unit: floppy and searches for the password from it.

in this program will be saved the password

without this floppy the pc can''t run.

(whatta stupid idea)

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You cannot program the bios unless you are a genius ASM programmer and know exactly how to flash the bios. There is a way to make it so that your bios boots with a password on most machines, but that isn''t what you want to do. What you want is to set your machine up, so that before windows is loaded, a lil peice of code is ran which asks for a floppy disk as the key. The floppy disc contains a file on it. The program that loads at startup checks the file on the floppy and continues on with loading windows (or linux). This all takes place after the bios has done it''s startup. As soon as the floppy disc is read, the bios is done all of its starting up.

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BIOS = Basic input/output system.

It needs to complete its startup *before* any IO operations (like reading data from a floppy) are possible. It could check external devices after its finished, but there''d be no point so it doesn''t. The BIOS password feature is built in and is checked before any of this happens.

If you really want a floppy to act like a ''key'' to the computer, then buy a case that has a physical key needed to switch the thing on, the floppy idea isn''t going to work.

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quote:
Original post by OrangyTang
BIOS = Basic input/output system.

It needs to complete its startup *before* any IO operations (like reading data from a floppy) are possible. It could check external devices after its finished, but there''d be no point so it doesn''t. The BIOS password feature is built in and is checked before any of this happens.

If you really want a floppy to act like a ''key'' to the computer, then buy a case that has a physical key needed to switch the thing on, the floppy idea isn''t going to work.
That''s not entirely true; on Linux it is possible to encrypt the hardrive partitions, and then move the /boot partition to a floppy/usb key, as well as a gpg private key to decrypt the hard drive w/o entering a password.

In short, the computer cannot be booted without the disk/key, and the hard drive can''t be read by anybody except (possibly) the NSA. It''s perfect for laptops that contain sensitive information.

I imagine something like this is possible on Windows as well.

Note that the BIOS is not involved at all.

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