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prh99

Ogg Vorbis SDK trouble

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My apologies if I've posted this in the wrong section. I've read through other posts about Ogg and the documentation on the Ogg website to see if I could find anything that would help, but I was unsuccessful. I've been trying to learn how to use the Ogg Vorbis SDK, but whenever I attempt to compile code I get errors. I've checked to make sure the header file, libraries, and DLL's are in the correct locations (to my knowledge they are). I am using MinGW with Dev-C++. When I attempt to compile the some of the example included with the SDK, such as this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <vorbis/vorbisenc.h>

#ifdef _WIN32 /* We need the following two to set stdin/stdout to binary */
#include <io.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#endif

#if defined(__MACOS__) && defined(__MWERKS__)
#include <console.h>      /* CodeWarrior's Mac "command-line" support */
#endif

#define READ 1024
signed char readbuffer[READ*4+44]; /* out of the data segment, not the stack */

int main(){
  ogg_stream_state os; /* take physical pages, weld into a logical
			  stream of packets */
  ogg_page         og; /* one Ogg bitstream page.  Vorbis packets are inside */
  ogg_packet       op; /* one raw packet of data for decode */
  
  vorbis_info      vi; /* struct that stores all the static vorbis bitstream
			  settings */
  vorbis_comment   vc; /* struct that stores all the user comments */

  vorbis_dsp_state vd; /* central working state for the packet->PCM decoder */
  vorbis_block     vb; /* local working space for packet->PCM decode */

  int eos=0,ret;
  int i, founddata;

#if defined(macintosh) && defined(__MWERKS__)
  int argc = 0;
  char **argv = NULL;
  argc = ccommand(&argv); /* get a "command line" from the Mac user */
                          /* this also lets the user set stdin and stdout */
#endif

  /* we cheat on the WAV header; we just bypass 44 bytes and never
     verify that it matches 16bit/stereo/44.1kHz.  This is just an
     example, after all. */

#ifdef _WIN32 /* We need to set stdin/stdout to binary mode. Damn windows. */
  /* if we were reading/writing a file, it would also need to in
     binary mode, eg, fopen("file.wav","wb"); */
  /* Beware the evil ifdef. We avoid these where we can, but this one we 
     cannot. Don't add any more, you'll probably go to hell if you do. */
  _setmode( _fileno( stdin ), _O_BINARY );
  _setmode( _fileno( stdout ), _O_BINARY );
#endif


  /* we cheat on the WAV header; we just bypass the header and never
     verify that it matches 16bit/stereo/44.1kHz.  This is just an
     example, after all. */

  readbuffer[0] = '\0';
  for (i=0, founddata=0; i<30 && ! feof(stdin) && ! ferror(stdin); i++)
  {
    fread(readbuffer,1,2,stdin);

    if ( ! strncmp((char*)readbuffer, "da", 2) )
    {
      founddata = 1;
      fread(readbuffer,1,6,stdin);
      break;
    }
  }

  /********** Encode setup ************/

  vorbis_info_init(&vi);

  /* choose an encoding mode.  A few possibilities commented out, one
     actually used: */

  /*********************************************************************
   Encoding using a VBR quality mode.  The usable range is -.1
   (lowest quality, smallest file) to 1. (highest quality, largest file).
   Example quality mode .4: 44kHz stereo coupled, roughly 128kbps VBR 
  
   ret = vorbis_encode_init_vbr(&vi,2,44100,.4);

   ---------------------------------------------------------------------

   Encoding using an average bitrate mode (ABR).
   example: 44kHz stereo coupled, average 128kbps VBR 
  
   ret = vorbis_encode_init(&vi,2,44100,-1,128000,-1);

   ---------------------------------------------------------------------

   Encode using a qulity mode, but select that quality mode by asking for
   an approximate bitrate.  This is not ABR, it is true VBR, but selected
   using the bitrate interface, and then turning bitrate management off:

   ret = ( vorbis_encode_setup_managed(&vi,2,44100,-1,128000,-1) ||
           vorbis_encode_ctl(&vi,OV_ECTL_RATEMANAGE_AVG,NULL) ||
           vorbis_encode_setup_init(&vi));

   *********************************************************************/

  ret=vorbis_encode_init_vbr(&vi,2,44100,.5);

  /* do not continue if setup failed; this can happen if we ask for a
     mode that libVorbis does not support (eg, too low a bitrate, etc,
     will return 'OV_EIMPL') */

  if(ret)exit(1);

  /* add a comment */
  vorbis_comment_init(&vc);
  vorbis_comment_add_tag(&vc,"ENCODER","encoder_example.c");

  /* set up the analysis state and auxiliary encoding storage */
  vorbis_analysis_init(&vd,&vi);
  vorbis_block_init(&vd,&vb);
  
  /* set up our packet->stream encoder */
  /* pick a random serial number; that way we can more likely build
     chained streams just by concatenation */
  srand(time(NULL));
  ogg_stream_init(&os,rand());

  /* Vorbis streams begin with three headers; the initial header (with
     most of the codec setup parameters) which is mandated by the Ogg
     bitstream spec.  The second header holds any comment fields.  The
     third header holds the bitstream codebook.  We merely need to
     make the headers, then pass them to libvorbis one at a time;
     libvorbis handles the additional Ogg bitstream constraints */

  {
    ogg_packet header;
    ogg_packet header_comm;
    ogg_packet header_code;

    vorbis_analysis_headerout(&vd,&vc,&header,&header_comm,&header_code);
    ogg_stream_packetin(&os,&header); /* automatically placed in its own
					 page */
    ogg_stream_packetin(&os,&header_comm);
    ogg_stream_packetin(&os,&header_code);

	/* This ensures the actual
	 * audio data will start on a new page, as per spec
	 */
	while(!eos){
		int result=ogg_stream_flush(&os,&og);
		if(result==0)break;
		fwrite(og.header,1,og.header_len,stdout);
		fwrite(og.body,1,og.body_len,stdout);
	}

  }
  
  while(!eos){
    long i;
    long bytes=fread(readbuffer,1,READ*4,stdin); /* stereo hardwired here */

    if(bytes==0){
      /* end of file.  this can be done implicitly in the mainline,
         but it's easier to see here in non-clever fashion.
         Tell the library we're at end of stream so that it can handle
         the last frame and mark end of stream in the output properly */
      vorbis_analysis_wrote(&vd,0);

    }else{
      /* data to encode */

      /* expose the buffer to submit data */
      float **buffer=vorbis_analysis_buffer(&vd,READ);
      
      /* uninterleave samples */
      for(i=0;i<bytes/4;i++){
	buffer[0][i]=((readbuffer[i*4+1]<<8)|
		      (0x00ff&(int)readbuffer[i*4]))/32768.f;
	buffer[1][i]=((readbuffer[i*4+3]<<8)|
		      (0x00ff&(int)readbuffer[i*4+2]))/32768.f;
      }
    
      /* tell the library how much we actually submitted */
      vorbis_analysis_wrote(&vd,i);
    }

    /* vorbis does some data preanalysis, then divvies up blocks for
       more involved (potentially parallel) processing.  Get a single
       block for encoding now */
    while(vorbis_analysis_blockout(&vd,&vb)==1){

      /* analysis, assume we want to use bitrate management */
      vorbis_analysis(&vb,NULL);
      vorbis_bitrate_addblock(&vb);

      while(vorbis_bitrate_flushpacket(&vd,&op)){
	
	/* weld the packet into the bitstream */
	ogg_stream_packetin(&os,&op);
	
	/* write out pages (if any) */
	while(!eos){
	  int result=ogg_stream_pageout(&os,&og);
	  if(result==0)break;
	  fwrite(og.header,1,og.header_len,stdout);
	  fwrite(og.body,1,og.body_len,stdout);
	  
	  /* this could be set above, but for illustrative purposes, I do
	     it here (to show that vorbis does know where the stream ends) */
	  
	  if(ogg_page_eos(&og))eos=1;
	}
      }
    }
  }

  /* clean up and exit.  vorbis_info_clear() must be called last */
  
  ogg_stream_clear(&os);
  vorbis_block_clear(&vb);
  vorbis_dsp_clear(&vd);
  vorbis_comment_clear(&vc);
  vorbis_info_clear(&vi);
  
  /* ogg_page and ogg_packet structs always point to storage in
     libvorbis.  They're never freed or manipulated directly */
  
  fprintf(stderr,"Done.\n");
  return(0);
}

I get the following errors:
g++.exe -c encoder_example.c -o encoder_example.o -I"C:/DEV-C++/include/c++"  -I"C:/DEV-C++/include/c++/mingw32"  -I"C:/DEV-C++/include/c++/backward"  -I"C:/DEV-C++/include"   -fsave-memoized -fexpensive-optimizations -O3 -mwindows
   
In file included from C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:24,
                 from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:26,
                 from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/vorbisenc.h:26,
                 from encoder_example.c:28:
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:38:26: _G_config.h: No such file or directory
In file included from C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:24,
                 from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:26,
                 from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/vorbisenc.h:26,
                 from encoder_example.c:28:
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:39: syntax error before `;' token
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:40: syntax error before `;' token
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:41: syntax error before `;' token
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:42: syntax error before `;' token
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/os_types.h:43: syntax error before `;' token
In file included from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:26,
                 from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/vorbisenc.h:26,
                 from encoder_example.c:28:
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:55: syntax error before `*' token
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:72: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is not 
   defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:77: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is not 
   defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:90: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is not 
   defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:92: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is not 
   defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/ogg/ogg.h:184: syntax error before `(' token
In file included from C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/vorbisenc.h:26,
                 from encoder_example.c:28:
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:77: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:78: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:80: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:81: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:82: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:83: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:100: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:101: 'ogg_int64_t' is used as a type, but is 
   not defined as a type.
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:180: type specifier omitted for parameter `
   ogg_int64_t'
C:/DEV-C++/include/vorbis/codec.h:180: parse error before `)' token
g++.exe encoder_example.o  -o "Project1.exe" -L"C:/DEV-C++/lib" C:/Dev-C++/lib/ogg/lib/vorbisenc.lib C:/Dev-C++/lib/ogg/lib/vorbis.lib 
G__~1.EXE: encoder_example.o: No such file or directory
Execution terminated
I've alos tried compiling the code from Anthony "TangentZ" Yuen's article Introduction to Ogg Vorbis with the same errors. Any help you can provid is greatly appreciated. [edited by - prh99 on January 14, 2004 12:20:14 AM]

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It thinks you're using Cygwin (you're not, Dev C++ uses MinGW32). Find the part of the ogg/os_types.h file that looks like this:

# ifndef __GNUC__
/* MSVC/Borland */
typedef __int64 ogg_int64_t;
typedef __int32 ogg_int32_t;
typedef unsigned __int32 ogg_uint32_t;
typedef __int16 ogg_int16_t;
typedef unsigned __int16 ogg_uint16_t;
# else
/* Cygwin */
#include <_G_config.h>
typedef _G_int64_t ogg_int64_t;
typedef _G_int32_t ogg_int32_t;
typedef _G_uint32_t ogg_uint32_t;
typedef _G_int16_t ogg_int16_t;
typedef _G_uint16_t ogg_uint16_t;
# endif

Change it to something like this (barring any more typos on my part):

# ifndef __GNUC__
/* MSVC/Borland */
typedef __int64 ogg_int64_t;
typedef __int32 ogg_int32_t;
typedef unsigned __int32 ogg_uint32_t;
typedef __int16 ogg_int16_t;
typedef unsigned __int16 ogg_uint16_t;
# elif defined(__CYGWIN__)
/* Cygwin */
#include <_G_config.h>
typedef _G_int64_t ogg_int64_t;
typedef _G_int32_t ogg_int32_t;
typedef _G_uint32_t ogg_uint32_t;
typedef _G_int16_t ogg_int16_t;
typedef _G_uint16_t ogg_uint16_t;
# elif defined(__MINGW32__)
/* MinGW32 */
#include <_mingw.h>

typedef __int64 ogg_int64_t;
typedef __int32 ogg_int32_t;
typedef unsigned __int32 ogg_uint32_t;
typedef __int16 ogg_int16_t;
typedef unsigned __int16 ogg_uint16_t;
# else
#error Not defaults for os_type.h were inserted into the file.
# endif

That whole part of the file is kind-of stupid. Feel free to report it to the maintainers or something if that isn't fixed yet.



[edited by - Null and Void on January 14, 2004 12:32:00 AM]

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quote:
Original post by Null and Void
It thinks you're using Cygwin (you're not, Dev C++ uses MinGW32). Find the part of the ogg/os_types.h file that looks like this:
That whole part of the file is kind-of stupid. Feel free to report it to the maintainers or something if that isn't fixed yet.



[edited by - Null and Void on January 14, 2004 12:32:00 AM]



Thanks, I'll try that.


[edited by - prh99 on January 14, 2004 12:45:35 AM]

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quote:
Original post by Null and Void
It thinks you''re using Cygwin (you''re not, Dev C++ uses MinGW32). Find the part of the ogg/os_types.h file that looks like this:

That whole part of the file is kind-of stupid. Feel free to report it to the maintainers or something if that isn''t fixed yet.



[edited by - Null and Void on January 14, 2004 12:32:00 AM]



Thank you very much for your help. With the aid of your modification and adding definitions for __int16 and __int32 I got it work.

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