• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

rsnail

Groundbreaking Sales Strategy

4 posts in this topic

The King himself (Stephen) is taking a huge internet risk, he plans to sell his latest book in short episodes. Each reader is asked to pay $1.00 before or after they download the chapter, if 75% of the readers pay, then the next chapter will be released. If this is successful I believe this could have a huge impact in the game industry. Imagine selling each level for $1.00, or players subscribing to your game. Let us watch closely...... http://www.stephenking.com/ http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1005-200-2332180.html?tag=st.ne.1005.thed.ni Edited by - rsnail on 7/24/00 9:42:46 AM
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by rsnail

The King himself (Stephen) is taking a huge internet risk, he plans to sell his latest book in short episodes. Each reader is asked to pay $1.00 before or after they download the chapter, if 75% of the readers pay, then the next chapter will be released.



That''s a pretty cool idea, although I don''t know if I''d like reading a novel online. It''s less portable and it''s kind of hard on the eyes.

quote:

If this is successful I believe this could have a huge impact in the game industry. Imagine selling each level for $1.00, or players subscribing to your game.

Let us watch closely......

Edited by - rsnail on 7/24/00 9:42:46 AM


That''s an interesting idea. Instead of shareware, you could just release a few levels at a time for a price.

"The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom." --William Blake

"The road of excess also just ends up making me tired because I'm too lazy" --Nazrix
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Think back a few years...a little known game by an obscure company did exactly that already...maybe you''ve heard of it...the game is called "Doom", by id software...

Shareware essentially does that already...and has for years. The first release of most shareware wasn''t even shareware. It was free to use. If the product was good enough to be noticed, and there was enough feedback, the author would consider that incentive to improve it. Then the product would become shareware. As the sales come in, however slowly, the extra cash would become further incentive to keep improving the software. And so on.

But once the incentive goes away, the software usually becomes static.

The Stephen King buck-at-a-time-online-novel isn''t so much an innovative packaging idea, as a clever attempt to see if people will pay $15-$20 for a novel that isn''t in hardback form...and they have to print it themselves. $1 per chapter doesn''t sound too bad...until you realize that there are going to be 15-20 chapters in the book...

DavidRM
Samu Games
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only problem with this is that the effort (let alone the cost) of writing chapter 1 of a game is a lot greater than the cost of writing chapter 1 of a book. Even if he spends 6 months planning the book he could still be up to chapter 6 by the end of year 1. The Quake IV engine wouldn''t even be at the demo stage by then.


Dan Marchant
Obscure Productions
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites