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Total beginner books/tips/advice

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Ok for a while now I have been wanting to learn C++ for game design, but I''m a total newbie to this but still am very interested in it. For my beginners books I have decided that I may buy these books would you reccomend them to a learner that has no programming skills? Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days (4th Edition) (there also was a 6th edition some where on there which would be the best?) and/or Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus (2nd Edition) Which would be the best? I think the tricks of windows game programming comes with a CD, is the CD usefull? or is it something I can download for free? So I''m asking your opinion on those books! Also pass along some helpful articles/links/usefull info to help me learn game programming! Once I get more time i''m going to read around this website it seems to be filled with usefull info! thanks! (please comment on those books if you know anything about them)

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Get a good C++ book. Just C++. I''d recommend a Deitel book. Others will recommend some other titles but let me say it again, you want to start with simple text screens and straight C++. After a few months of that you might want to look into TOTWGPG. Cheers and luck.

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I don''t know much about those books, and I learned C++ long after I learned programming, but I do know that About.com''s C++ Tutorials have helped a lot in learning new things about C++, or as a reference. I suppose the beginning tutorials are reasonable, too. It''d be at least something to check out, although I''m sure there''re better sites out there.

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Theres a pretty good c++ tutorial with VC++ 6. Sams is ok, but maybe a bit advanced for starting off. I learnt c++ from the tutorials at cprogramming.com.

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thanks joey for the link! I''ll check it out!

so you think the Windows game programming book would be the best? What about the CD? anygood or is it crap?

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whoops, they''re both published by Sams, well i mean the the "tricks.." is a bit advanced and its not C++, its the next stage up from that, the API, structuring, Philosophy etc..

Most C++ books and tutorials will be pretty much the same.

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I''ve read both Teach yourself c++ in 21 days, and C++ Primer Plus(author:stephen pratta).

IMO, I extremely recommend getting C++ Primer Plus.

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quote:
Original post by deathtrap
I''ve read both Teach yourself c++ in 21 days, and C++ Primer Plus(author:stephen pratta).

IMO, I extremely recommend getting C++ Primer Plus.


for a total noobie?

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Just about every type of game can be developed with C++. Then again, just about every type of game can be developed with many other languages as well. C++ is one of the more powerful languages, in that you can get at the details of how your program works and interacts with the platform/OS, but that detail often makes development time longer and more difficult.

Learning what language to use for specific projects comes with experience (that I certainly have only a limited amount of). But choice of language is certainly a subjective thing, based both on the type of project you''re working on, as well as the experience the developers have. If C++ would work just as well as other languages, but your development team really knows C++ inside and out, then there''s no reason to make them learn Java.

For now, though, pick a language (it seems you''ve chosen C++, which is probably fine), and learn the more general concepts of programming, and gain experience. Choice of language for projects will become more obvious as you learn.

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It''s not like 3d game maker its like a puzzle and you have to figure how to make each game using the peices(peices meaning function,constuctures,ect).Hope that helps.

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I would second the Deitel "How to program C++" book, I used their Java book and it worked wonderfully. I would also recommend you pick a reference book called "C++ The complete reference" (Third edition) by Herbert Schildt.

These would be great programming book sfor a noob. THe herb schildt book should run u about $40 i got mine for like $35 about 3 years ago so he may have a new edition out i don''t know. the Deitel book is used as a college textbook so it will have lots of homework style stuff that you would be used to seeing, unfortunately this will raise the price near $100 so i would try to find that one used, unless you want to keep it forever then i would shell out the extra money and get the new one.

links:
www.msdn.microsoft.com this is for when you have finished the deitel book and want reference for windows programming.
search on google for C++ tuts how to''s etc. and that will also give you a hand.
www.bloodshed.com
I would also pick up the blooshed Dev C++ compiler and IDE but i would seriously consider picking a Visual C++ compiler 6 or .NET or .NET 2003 they shouldn''t be too much if you are a student, but they are fully finished products like the pros use so i would recommend them.

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I think Accelerated C++ is a lot better. The approach and info is better too, also it teaches more usueful things, and it uses STL first, then makes data structures later.

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zahlman
I think its ok if you know that BEFOR,WHILE and after you read it,but I''m only 14!

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well that''s not what caught my eye it was the fact that I WANT TO LEARN C++ and 2 people have reccomended it to me...I want to learn it and not spend a whole lot of money. I have no programming knowledge...and if a bunch of people keep reccomending different books then that''s not really helping me, I just need to know is the sams teach your self C++ in 21 days a good book for a noob? then I can get a more advanced book later on...I just need a good solid starting place...

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I read the second edition. It''s not great, but I guess it might be good for a beginner. The book I suggested is also good for a beginner and I wouldn''t think just because a book is better it cost more. The Accelerated C++ teaches you more about programming, and teaches you the uses of things and stuff that is''t covered in teh sams teach yourself book like the STL. While the Teach yourself book just teaches you the basic syntax of the language. So Accelerated C++ might be more suited towards a beginner who hasn''t programmed before. So I would suggest Accelerated C++ book. But if you want the Teach Yourself book you should get it.

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I found this book around the house "Walter Savitch: Problem solving with C++ The object of programming SEVOND EDITION"

what about this???

Also does anyone else have a opinion on Accelerated C++?

[edited by - Gamedesign101 on February 6, 2004 12:02:50 AM]

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I strongly agree with the previous poster regarding any programming book that claims to teach you in anything 21 days, or 24 hours, or whatever. I''ve heard good things about the C++ Primer books, as well as Ivor Horton''s Beginning Visual C++ 6 from Wrox Press (although having seen this book, I would still shy away from it because it''s more a "learn enough C++ to make an MFC app" sort of book). The one book I keep on hand as a very thorough reference on standard ANSI/ISO compliant C++ is "Core C++: A Software Engineering Approach" by Victor Shtern. I like it because it doesn''t only give you the "How To"''s, but also the "Why"''s of anything and everything C++ related. It''s also helpful to the beginner because it doesn''t expose you to the mess that Microsoft''s dev studio throws at you with its project wizards (primarily the MFC app wizards) and generated code. Not Microsoft bashing by any means here (it pays the bills), but it does nothing but either confuse the beginner, or get them hooked on using the wizards, which you just really don''t use in "real" production code (unless maybe you''re some sort of masochist programmer...lol), and you really end up spending USD 60 or more on a book and still do not really know what you''re doing.

Good luck!

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